ICD-10-CM Code M79.7

Fibromyalgia

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

M79.7 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code M79.7 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like fibromyalgia, fibromyositis, fibrositis, fibrositis and nodular fasciitis, fibrositis arm, fibrositis of neck, etc

ICD-10:M79.7
Short Description:Fibromyalgia
Long Description:Fibromyalgia

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code M79.7:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Fibromyositis
  • Fibrositis
  • Myofibrositis

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code M79.7 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Fibromyositis
  • Fibrositis
  • Fibrositis and nodular fasciitis
  • Fibrositis arm
  • Fibrositis of neck
  • Muscular rheumatism
  • Primary fibromyalgia syndrome
  • Primary fibrositis
  • Scapulohumeral fibrositis
  • Secondary fibrositis

Clinical Information

  • FIBROMYALGIA-. a common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation trigger points. muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. this condition is often associated with general symptoms such as sleep disturbances fatigue stiffness headaches and occasionally depression. there is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome fatigue syndrome chronic. fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. it is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. from adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed p1494 95

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code M79.7 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 555 - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE WITH MCC
  • 556 - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE WITHOUT MCC

Convert M79.7 to ICD-9

  • 729.1 - Myalgia and myositis NOS (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Other soft tissue disorders (M70-M79)
      • Oth and unsp soft tissue disorders, not elsewhere classified (M79)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Fibromyalgia

What is fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is chronic condition that causes pain all over the body, fatigue, and other symptoms. People with fibromyalgia may be more sensitive to pain than people who don't have it. This is called abnormal pain perception processing.

What causes fibromyalgia?

The exact cause of fibromyalgia is unknown. Researchers think that certain things might contribute to its cause:

  • Stressful or traumatic events, such as car accidents
  • Repetitive injuries
  • Illnesses such as viral infections

Sometimes, fibromyalgia can develop on its own. It can run in families, so genes may play a role in the cause.

Who is at risk for fibromyalgia?

Anyone can get fibromyalgia, but it is more common in

  • Women; they are twice as likely to have fibromyalgia
  • Middle-aged people
  • People with certain diseases, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis
  • People who have a family member with fibromyalgia

What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia?

Common symptoms of fibromyalgia include

  • Pain and stiffness all over the body
  • Fatigue and tiredness
  • Problems with thinking, memory, and concentration (sometimes called "fibro fog")
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Headaches, including migraines
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Numbness or tingling in the hands and feet
  • Pain in the face or jaw, including disorders of the jaw know as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ)
  • Sleep problems

How is fibromyalgia diagnosed?

Fibromyalgia can be hard to diagnose. It sometimes takes visits to several different health care providers to get a diagnosis. One problem is that there isn't a specific test for it. And the main symptoms, pain and fatigue, are common in many other conditions. Health care providers have to rule out other causes of the symptoms before making a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. This is called making a differential diagnosis.

To make a diagnosis, your health care provider

  • Will take your medical history and ask detailed questions about your symptoms
  • Will do a physical exam
  • May do x-rays and blood tests to rule out other conditions
  • Will consider the guidelines for diagnosing fibromyalgia, which include
    • A history of widespread pain lasting more than 3 months
    • Physical symptoms including fatigue, waking unrefreshed, and cognitive (memory or thought) problems
    • The number of areas throughout the body in which you had pain in the past week

What are the treatments for fibromyalgia?

Not all health care providers are familiar with fibromyalgia and its treatment. You should see a doctor or team of healthcare providers who specialize in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

Fibromyalgia is treated with a combination of treatments, which may include medicines, lifestyle changes, talk therapy, and complementary therapies:

  • Medicines
    • Over-the-counter pain relievers
    • Prescription medicines that were specifically approved to treat fibromyalgia
    • Prescription pain medicines
    • Certain antidepressants, which may help with pain or sleep problems
  • Lifestyle changes
    • Getting enough sleep
    • Getting regular physical activity. If you have not already been active, start slowly and gradually increase how much activity you get. You may want to see a physical therapist, who can help you create a plan that is right for you.
    • Learning how to manage stress
    • Eating a healthy diet
    • Learning to pace yourself. If you do too much, it can make your symptoms worse. So you need to learn to balance being active with your need for rest.
  • Talk therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), can help you learn strategies to deal with pain, stress, and negative thoughts. If you also have depression along with your fibromyalgia, talk therapy can help with that too.
  • Complementary therapies have helped some people with the symptoms of fibromyalgia. But researchers need to do more studies to show which ones are effective. You could consider trying them, but you should check with your health care provider first. These therapies include
    • Massage therapy
    • Movement therapies
    • Chiropractic therapy
    • Acupuncture

[Learn More]

Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia is a common condition characterized by long-lasting (chronic) pain affecting many areas of the body. The pain is associated with tenderness that occurs with touch or pressure on the muscles, joints, or skin. Some affected individuals also report numbness, tingling, or a burning sensation (paresthesia) in the arms and legs.Other signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia include excessive tiredness (exhaustion); sleep problems, such as waking up feeling unrefreshed; and problems with memory or thinking clearly. People with fibromyalgia often report additional types of pain, including headaches, back and neck pain, sore throat, pain or clicking in the jaw (temporomandibular joint dysfunction), and stomach pain or digestive disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. They have an increased likelihood of developing mood or psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, many people with fibromyalgia do not have a mental health condition.The major signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia can occur by themselves or together with another chronic pain condition such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or systemic lupus erythematosus.
[Learn More]