ICD-10-CM Code M36.0

Dermato(poly)myositis in neoplastic disease

Version 2020 Billable Code Manifestation Diagnoses

Valid for Submission

M36.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of dermato(poly)myositis in neoplastic disease. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code M36.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like dermatomyositis with malignant disease.

ICD-10:M36.0
Short Description:Dermato(poly)myositis in neoplastic disease
Long Description:Dermato(poly)myositis in neoplastic disease

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code M36.0:

Code First

Code First
Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Manifestation diagnoses - Manifestation codes describe the manifestation of an underlying disease, not the disease itself, and therefore should not be used as a principal diagnosis.

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Dermatomyositis with malignant disease

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code M36.0 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 545 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 546 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 547 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert M36.0 to ICD-9

  • 710.3 - Dermatomyositis (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
      • Systemic disorders of conn tiss in diseases classd elswhr (M36)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Myositis

Myositis means inflammation of the muscles that you use to move your body. An injury, infection, or autoimmune disease can cause it. Two specific kinds are polymyositis and dermatomyositis. Polymyositis causes muscle weakness, usually in the muscles closest to the trunk of your body. Dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness, plus a skin rash.

Other symptoms of myositis may include

  • Fatigue after walking or standing
  • Tripping or falling
  • Trouble swallowing or breathing

Doctors may use a physical exam, lab tests, imaging tests and a muscle biopsy to diagnose myositis. There is no cure for these diseases, but you can treat the symptoms. Polymyositis and dermatomyositis are first treated with high doses of a corticosteroid. Other options include medications, physical therapy, exercise, heat therapy, assistive devices, and rest.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


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