ICD-10 Code M25.071

Hemarthrosis, right ankle

Version 2019 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

M25.071 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hemarthrosis, right ankle. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: M25.071
Short Description:Hemarthrosis, right ankle
Long Description:Hemarthrosis, right ankle

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Other joint disorders (M20-M25)
      • Other joint disorder, not elsewhere classified (M25)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code M25.071 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 553 - BONE DISEASES AND ARTHROPATHIES WITH MCC
  • 554 - BONE DISEASES AND ARTHROPATHIES WITHOUT MCC

Convert M25.071 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 719.17 - Hemarthrosis-ankle (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Ankle Injuries and Disorders

Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one another, stabilize and support it. Your muscles and tendons move it.

The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is an injury to the ligaments. It may take a few weeks to many months to heal completely. A fracture is a break in a bone. You can also injure other parts of the ankle such as tendons, which join muscles to bone, and cartilage, which cushions your joints. Ankle sprains and fractures are common sports injuries.

  • Ankle arthroscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ankle fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ankle pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ankle replacement (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ankle sprain - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Bleeding

Also called: Hematoma, Hemorrhage

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen outside or inside the body. You may bleed when you get a cut or other wound. Bleeding can also be due to an injury to internal organs.

Sometimes bleeding can cause other problems. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease.

Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.

  • Bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bleeding gums (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bleeding into the skin (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Foot Injuries and Disorders

Each of your feet has 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments. No wonder a lot of things can go wrong. Here are a few common problems:

  • Bunions - hard, painful bumps on the big toe joint
  • Corns and calluses - thickened skin from friction or pressure
  • Plantar warts - warts on the soles of your feet
  • Fallen arches - also called flat feet

Ill-fitting shoes often cause these problems. Aging and being overweight also increase your chances of having foot problems.

  • Claw foot (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Clubfoot (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Extremity x-ray (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Flat feet (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot sprain - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand or foot spasms (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • High arch (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsus adductus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Morton neuroma (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.