ICD-10-CM Code M21.5

Acquired clawhand, clubhand, clawfoot and clubfoot

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

M21.5 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of acquired clawhand, clubhand, clawfoot and clubfoot. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:M21.5
Short Description:Acquired clawhand, clubhand, clawfoot and clubfoot
Long Description:Acquired clawhand, clubhand, clawfoot and clubfoot

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • M21.51 - Acquired clawhand
  • M21.511 - Acquired clawhand, right hand
  • M21.512 - Acquired clawhand, left hand
  • M21.519 - Acquired clawhand, unspecified hand
  • M21.52 - Acquired clubhand
  • M21.521 - Acquired clubhand, right hand
  • M21.522 - Acquired clubhand, left hand
  • M21.529 - Acquired clubhand, unspecified hand
  • M21.53 - Acquired clawfoot
  • M21.531 - Acquired clawfoot, right foot
  • M21.532 - Acquired clawfoot, left foot
  • M21.539 - Acquired clawfoot, unspecified foot
  • M21.54 - Acquired clubfoot
  • M21.541 - Acquired clubfoot, right foot
  • M21.542 - Acquired clubfoot, left foot
  • M21.549 - Acquired clubfoot, unspecified foot

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code M21.5:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • clubfoot, not specified as acquired Q66.89

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Other joint disorders (M20-M25)
      • Other acquired deformities of limbs (M21)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Foot Injuries and Disorders

Each of your feet has 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments. No wonder a lot of things can go wrong. Here are a few common problems:

  • Bunions - hard, painful bumps on the big toe joint
  • Corns and calluses - thickened skin from friction or pressure
  • Plantar warts - warts on the soles of your feet
  • Fallen arches - also called flat feet

Ill-fitting shoes often cause these problems. Aging and being overweight also increase your chances of having foot problems.

  • Claw foot (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Clubfoot (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Extremity x-ray (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Flat feet (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot sprain - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand or foot spasms (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • High arch (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsus adductus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Morton neuroma (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Hand Injuries and Disorders

No matter how old you are or what you do for a living, you are always using your hands. When there is something wrong with them, you may not be able to do your regular activities.

Hand problems include

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome - compression of a nerve as it goes through the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb
  • Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations
  • Osteoarthritis - wear-and-tear arthritis, which can also cause deformity
  • Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons
  • Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb
  • Brachial plexopathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Claw hand (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dupuytrens contracture (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand or foot spasms (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand x-ray (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]