ICD-10-CM Code M1A.13

Lead-induced chronic gout, wrist

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

M1A.13 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of lead-induced chronic gout, wrist. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:M1A.13
Short Description:Lead-induced chronic gout, wrist
Long Description:Lead-induced chronic gout, wrist

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • M1A.131 - Lead-induced chronic gout, right wrist
  • M1A.1310 - Lead-induced chronic gout, right wrist, without tophus (tophi)
  • M1A.1311 - Lead-induced chronic gout, right wrist, with tophus (tophi)
  • M1A.132 - Lead-induced chronic gout, left wrist
  • M1A.1320 - Lead-induced chronic gout, left wrist, without tophus (tophi)
  • M1A.1321 - Lead-induced chronic gout, left wrist, with tophus (tophi)
  • M1A.139 - Lead-induced chronic gout, unspecified wrist
  • M1A.1390 - Lead-induced chronic gout, unspecified wrist, without tophus (tophi)
  • M1A.1391 - Lead-induced chronic gout, unspecified wrist, with tophus (tophi)

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code M1A.13 are found in the index:


Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Inflammatory polyarthropathies (M05-M14)
      • Chronic gout (M1A)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Gout

Gout is a common, painful form of arthritis. It causes swollen, red, hot and stiff joints.

Gout happens when uric acid builds up in your body. Uric acid comes from the breakdown of substances called purines. Purines are in your body's tissues and in foods, such as liver, dried beans and peas, and anchovies. Normally, uric acid dissolves in the blood. It passes through the kidneys and out of the body in urine. But sometimes uric acid can build up and form needle-like crystals. When they form in your joints, it is very painful. The crystals can also cause kidney stones.

Often, gout first attacks your big toe. It can also attack ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers, and elbows. At first, gout attacks usually get better in days. Eventually, attacks last longer and happen more often.

You are more likely to get gout if you

  • Are a man
  • Have family member with gout
  • Are overweight
  • Drink alcohol
  • Eat too many foods rich in purines

Gout can be hard to diagnose. Your doctor may take a sample of fluid from an inflamed joint to look for crystals. You can treat gout with medicines.

Pseudogout has similar symptoms and is sometimes confused with gout. However, it is caused by calcium phosphate, not uric acid.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


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Lead Poisoning

Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our environment. Much of it comes from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may still have lead paint. You could be exposed to lead by

  • Eating food or drinking water that contains lead. Water pipes in older homes may contain lead.
  • Working in a job where lead is used
  • Using lead in a hobby, such as making stained glass or lead-glazed pottery
  • Using folk remedies such as herbs or foods that contain lead

Breathing air, drinking water, eating food, or swallowing or touching dirt that contains lead can cause many health problems. Lead can affect almost every organ and system in your body. In adults, lead can increase blood pressure and cause infertility, nerve disorders, and muscle and joint pain. It can also make you irritable and affect your ability to concentrate and remember.

Lead is especially dangerous for children. A child who swallows large amounts of lead may develop anemia, severe stomachache, muscle weakness, and brain damage. Even at low levels, lead can affect a child's mental and physical growth.

Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry


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