2022 ICD-10-CM Code L66.3

Perifolliculitis capitis abscedens

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:L66.3
Short Description:Perifolliculitis capitis abscedens
Long Description:Perifolliculitis capitis abscedens

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Disorders of skin appendages (L60-L75)
      • Cicatricial alopecia [scarring hair loss] (L66)

L66.3 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of perifolliculitis capitis abscedens. The code L66.3 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code L66.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like follicular occlusion tetrad - hidradenitis, acne conglobata, dissecting cellulitis, pilonidal sinus, follicular occlusion triad - hidradenitis, acne conglobata, dissecting cellulitis of scalp, hidradenitis, hidradenitis, hidradenitis suppurativa , hidradenitis suppurativa, etc.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code L66.3 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert L66.3 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code L66.3 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Hair Loss

You lose up to 100 hairs from your scalp every day. That's normal, and in most people, those hairs grow back. But many men -- and some women -- lose hair as they grow older. You can also lose your hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition.

Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying cause will correct the problem. Other treatments include medicines and hair restoration.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)