ICD-10 Diagnosis Code L29.1

Pruritus scroti

Diagnosis Code L29.1

ICD-10: L29.1
Short Description: Pruritus scroti
Long Description: Pruritus scroti
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code L29.1

Valid for Submission
The code L29.1 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
Version 2019 Billable Code Diagnoses For Males Only

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for males only - Diagnoses for males only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code L29.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 729 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH CC/MCC
  • 730 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 698.1 - Pruritus of genitalia (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Scrotal pruritus

Index to Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code L29.1 in the Index to Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Itching

Also called: Pruritus

What is itching?

Itching is an irritating sensation that makes you want to scratch your skin. Sometimes it can feel like pain, but it is different. Often, you feel itchy in one area in your body, but sometimes you may feel itching all over. Along with the itching, you may also have a rash or hives.

What causes itching?

Itching is a symptom of many health conditions. Some common causes are

  • Allergic reactions to food, insect bites, pollen, and medicines
  • Skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dry skin
  • Irritating chemicals, cosmetics, and other substances
  • Parasites such as pinworms, scabies, head and body lice
  • Pregnancy
  • Liver, kidney, or thyroid diseases
  • Certain cancers or cancer treatments
  • Diseases that can affect the nervous system, such as diabetes and shingles

What are the treatments for itching?

Most itching is not serious. To feel better, you could try

  • Applying cold compresses
  • Using moisturizing lotions
  • Taking lukewarm or oatmeal baths
  • Using over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or antihistamines
  • Avoiding scratching, wearing irritating fabrics, and exposure to high heat and humidity

Contact your health care provider if your itching is severe, does not go away after a few weeks, or does not have an apparent cause. You may need other treatments, such as medicines or light therapy. If you have an underlying disease that is causing the itching, treating that disease may help.

  • Itching (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lichen simplex chronicus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Urticaria pigmentosa (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Testicular Disorders

Testicles, or testes, make male hormones and sperm. They are two egg-shaped organs inside the scrotum, the loose sac of skin behind the penis. It's easy to injure your testicles because they are not protected by bones or muscles. Men and boys should wear athletic supporters when they play sports.

You should examine your testicles monthly and seek medical attention for lumps, redness, pain or other changes. Testicles can get inflamed or infected. They can also develop cancer. Testicular cancer is rare and highly treatable. It usually happens between the ages of 15 and 40.

  • Anorchia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hydrocele (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hydrocele repair (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Orchitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Scrotal masses (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Testicle lump (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Testicle pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Testicular self-examination (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Varicocele (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

Previous Code
L29.0
Next Code
L29.2