ICD-10 Diagnosis Code L21.1

Seborrheic infantile dermatitis

Diagnosis Code L21.1

ICD-10: L21.1
Short Description: Seborrheic infantile dermatitis
Long Description: Seborrheic infantile dermatitis
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code L21.1

Valid for Submission
The code L21.1 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Dermatitis and eczema (L20-L30)
      • Seborrheic dermatitis (L21)


Version 2019 Billable Code Pediatric Diagnoses

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Pediatric diagnoses - Pediatric. Age range is 0–17 years inclusive (e.g., Reye’s syndrome, routine child health exam).

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code L21.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 606 - MINOR SKIN DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 607 - MINOR SKIN DISORDERS WITHOUT MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 690.12 - Sbrheic infantl drmtitis (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Acute seborrheic dermatitis
  • Chronic seborrheic dermatitis
  • Facial seborrheic dermatitis
  • Generalized seborrheic dermatitis of infants
  • Infantile seborrheic dermatitis
  • Primary seborrhea
  • Sebaceous hyperplasia
  • Seborrhea
  • Seborrhea adiposa
  • Seborrhea corporis
  • Seborrhea faciei
  • Seborrhea nasi
  • Seborrheic blepharitis
  • Seborrheic dermatitis
  • Seborrheic eczema-like eruption
  • Seborrhoeide
  • Truncal seborrheic dermatitis

Index to Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code L21.1 in the Index to Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Dandruff, Cradle Cap, and Other Scalp Conditions

Also called: Seborrhea, Seborrheic Dermatitis

Your scalp is the skin on the top of your head. Unless you have hair loss, hair grows on your scalp. Different skin problems can affect your scalp.

Dandruff is a flaking of the skin. The flakes are yellow or white. Dandruff may make your scalp feel itchy. It usually starts after puberty, and is more common in men. Dandruff is usually a symptom of seborrheic dermatitis, or seborrhea. It is a skin condition that can also cause redness and irritation of the skin.

Most of the time, using a dandruff shampoo can help control your dandruff. If that does not work, contact your health care provider.

There is a type of seborrheic dermatitis that babies can get. It is called cradle cap. It usually lasts a few months, and then goes away on its own. Besides the scalp, it can sometimes affect other parts of the body, such as the eyelids, armpits, groin, and ears. Normally, washing your baby's hair every day with a mild shampoo and gently rubbing their scalp with your fingers or a soft brush can help. For severe cases, your health care provider may give you a prescription shampoo or cream to use.

Other problems that can affect the scalp include

  • Scalp ringworm, a fungal infection that causes itchy, red patches on your head. It can also leave bald spots. It usually affects children.
  • Scalp psoriasis, which causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. About half of the people with psoriasis have it on their scalp.
  • Cradle cap (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Seborrheic dermatitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tinea capitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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