ICD-10 Code L02.429

Furuncle of limb, unspecified

Version 2019 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

L02.429 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of furuncle of limb, unspecified. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: L02.429
Short Description:Furuncle of limb, unspecified
Long Description:Furuncle of limb, unspecified

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L08)
      • Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle (L02)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code L02.429 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 602 - CELLULITIS WITH MCC
  • 603 - CELLULITIS WITHOUT MCC

Convert L02.429 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 680.3 - Carbuncle of arm (Approximate Flag)
  • 680.6 - Carbuncle of leg (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Boil of elbow
  • Boil of lower leg
  • Boil of lower limb
  • Boil of upper arm and forearm
  • Boil of upper limb
  • Furuncle of ankle
  • Furuncle of axilla
  • Furuncle of chest wall
  • Furuncle of forearm
  • Furuncle of hip
  • Furuncle of knee
  • Furuncle of leg, except foot
  • Furuncle of shoulder
  • Furuncle of thigh
  • Furuncle of upper arm
  • Furuncle of wrist

Information for Patients


Skin Infections

Your skin helps protect you from germs, but sometimes it can get infected by them. Some common types of skin infections are

  • Bacterial: Cellulitis and impetigo. Staphylococcal infections can also affect the skin.
  • Viral: Shingles, warts, and herpes simplex
  • Fungal: Athlete's foot and yeast infections
  • Parasitic: Body lice, head lice, and scabies

Treatment of skin infections depends on the cause.

  • Blastomycosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Boils (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Candida infection of the skin (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carbuncle (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Donovanosis (granuloma inguinale) (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ecthyma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Erysipelas (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Molluscum contagiosum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Staphylococcal Infections

Also called: Staph

Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including

  • Skin infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Food poisoning
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Blood poisoning (bacteremia)

Skin infections are the most common. They can look like pimples or boils. They may be red, swollen and painful, and sometimes have pus or other drainage. They can turn into impetigo, which turns into a crust on the skin, or cellulitis, a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot.

Anyone can get a staph skin infection. You are more likely to get one if you have a cut or scratch, or have contact with a person or surface that has staph bacteria. The best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder to treat.

  • Boils (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carbuncle (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Scalded skin syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Staph infections -- self-care at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxic shock syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tracheitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.