ICD-10 Code J41.8

Mixed simple and mucopurulent chronic bronchitis

Diagnosis Code J41.8

ICD-10: J41.8
Short Description: Mixed simple and mucopurulent chronic bronchitis
Long Description: Mixed simple and mucopurulent chronic bronchitis
Version 2019 of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code J41.8

Valid for Submission
The code J41.8 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the respiratory system (J00–J99)
    • Chronic lower respiratory diseases (J40-J47)
      • Simple and mucopurulent chronic bronchitis (J41)
Version 2019 Billable Code

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code J41.8 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 190 - CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WITH MCC
  • 191 - CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WITH CC
  • 192 - CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 491.8 - Chronic bronchitis NEC (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Fetid chronic bronchitis
  • Mixed simple and mucopurulent chronic bronchitis

Index to Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code J41.8 in the Index to Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Chronic Bronchitis

Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It causes a cough that often brings up mucus. It can also cause shortness of breath, wheezing, a low fever, and chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic.

Chronic bronchitis is one type of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The inflamed bronchial tubes produce a lot of mucus. This leads to coughing and difficulty breathing. Cigarette smoking is the most common cause. Breathing in air pollution, fumes, or dust over a long period of time may also cause it.

To diagnose chronic bronchitis, your doctor will look at your signs and symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests.

Chronic bronchitis is a long-term condition that keeps coming back or never goes away completely. If you smoke, it is important to quit. Treatment can help with your symptoms. It often includes medicines to open your airways and help clear away mucus. You may also need oxygen therapy. Pulmonary rehabilitation may help you manage better in daily life.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • How to breathe when you are short of breath (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Traveling with breathing problems (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Using oxygen at home (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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