2021 ICD-10-CM Code I69.89

Other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

I69.89 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

I69.89 is a sequela code, includes a 7th character and should be used for complications that arise as a direct result of a condition like other e of other cerebrovascular disease. According to ICD-10-CM Guidelines a "sequela" code should be used for chronic or residual conditions that are complications of an initial acute disease, illness or injury. The most common sequela is pain. Usually, two diagnosis codes are needed when reporting sequela. The first code describes the nature of the sequela while the second code describes the sequela or late effect.

ICD-10:I69.89
Short Description:Other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease
Long Description:Other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease

Non-specific codes like I69.89 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I69.890 for Apraxia following other cerebrovascular disease
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I69.891 for Dysphagia following other cerebrovascular disease
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I69.892 for Facial weakness following other cerebrovascular disease
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I69.893 for Ataxia following other cerebrovascular disease
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I69.898 for Other sequelae of other cerebrovascular disease

Information for Patients


Stroke

Also called: Brain attack, CVA

What is a stroke?

A stroke happens when there is a loss of blood flow to part of the brain. Your brain cells cannot get the oxygen and nutrients they need from blood, and they start to die within a few minutes. This can cause lasting brain damage, long-term disability, or even death.

If you think that you or someone else is having a stroke, call 911 right away. Immediate treatment may save someone's life and increase the chances for successful rehabilitation and recovery.

What are the types of stroke?

There are two types of stroke:

Another condition that's similar to a stroke is a transient ischemic attack (TIA). It's sometimes called a "mini-stroke." TIAs happen when the blood supply to the brain is blocked for a short time. The damage to the brain cells isn't permanent, but if you have had a TIA, you are at a much higher risk of having a stroke.

Who is at risk for a stroke?

Certain factors can raise your risk of a stroke. The major risk factors include

There are also other factors that are linked to a higher risk of stroke, such as

What are the symptoms of stroke?

The symptoms of stroke often happen quickly. They include

If you think that you or someone else is having a stroke, call 911 right away.

How are strokes diagnosed?

To make a diagnosis, your health care provider will

What are the treatments for stroke?

Treatments for stroke include medicines, surgery, and rehabilitation. Which treatments you get depend on the type of stroke and the stage of treatment. The different stages are

Acute treatments for ischemic stroke are usually medicines:

Acute treatments for hemorrhagic stroke focus on stopping the bleeding. The first step is to find the cause of bleeding in the brain. The next step is to control it:

Stroke rehabilitation can help you relearn skills you lost because of the damage. The goal is to help you become as independent as possible and to have the best possible quality of life.

Prevention of another stroke is also important, since having a stroke increases the risk of getting another one. Prevention may include heart-healthy lifestyle changes and medicines.

Can strokes be prevented?

If you have already had a stroke or are at risk of having a stroke, you can make some heart-healthy lifestyle changes to try to prevent a future stroke:

If these changes aren't enough, you may need medicine to control your risk factors.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)