I50.43 - Acute on chronic combined systolic (congestive) and diastolic (congestive) heart failure

Version 2023
ICD-10:I50.43
Short Description:Acute on chronic combined systolic and diastolic hrt fail
Long Description:Acute on chronic combined systolic (congestive) and diastolic (congestive) heart failure
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Other forms of heart disease (I30-I5A)
      • Heart failure (I50)

I50.43 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of acute on chronic combined systolic (congestive) and diastolic (congestive) heart failure. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The code is commonly used in cardiology medical specialties to specify clinical concepts such as heart failure.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
I50.43428.43 - Ac/chr syst/dia hrt fail
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.
I50.43428.43 - Ac/chr syst/dia hrt fail
Combination Flag - Multiple codes are needed to describe the source diagnosis code. Correct coding should be done based on contextual judgment.
I50.43428.0 - CHF NOS
Combination Flag - Multiple codes are needed to describe the source diagnosis code. Correct coding should be done based on contextual judgment.

Patient Education


Heart Failure

What is heart failure?

Heart failure means that your heart can't pump enough oxygen-rich blood to meet your body's needs. Heart failure doesn't mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop beating. But without enough blood flow, your organs may not work well, which can cause serious problems.

Heart failure can affect one or both sides of your heart:

Left-sided heart failure is more common than right-sided heart failure.

What causes heart failure?

Heart failure can start suddenly after a medical condition or injury damages your heart muscle. But in most cases, heart failure develops slowly from long-term medical conditions.

Conditions that can cause heart failure include:

Over time, left-sided heart failure can lead to right-sided heart failure.

Who is more likely to develop heart failure?

Heart failure can happen at any age. It happens to both men and women, but men often develop it at a younger age than women. Your chance of developing heart failure increases if:

What are the symptoms of heart failure?

The symptoms of heart failure depend on which side of your heart is affected and how serious your condition has become. Most symptoms are caused by reduced blood flow to your organs and fluid buildup in your body.

Fluid buildup happens because the flow of blood through your heart is too slow. As a result, blood backs up in the vessels that return the blood to your heart. Fluid may leak from the blood vessels and collect in the tissues of your body, causing swelling (edema) and other problems.

Symptoms of heart failure may include:

At first you may have no symptoms or mild symptoms. As the disease gets worse, your symptoms will usually bother you more.

What other problems does heart failure cause?

Fluid buildup and reduced blood flow to your organs can lead to serious problems, including:

How is heart failure diagnosed?

To find out if you have heart failure, your doctor will:

In some cases, your doctor may refer you to a cardiologist (a doctor who specializes in heart diseases) for tests, diagnosis, and care.

What are the treatments for heart failure?

Your treatment will depend on the type of heart failure you have and how serious it is. There's no cure for heart failure. But treatment can help you live longer with fewer symptoms.

Even with treatment, heart failure usually gets worse over time, so you'll likely need treatment for the rest of your life.

Most treatment plans include:

You may need heart surgery if:

As part of your treatment, you'll need to pay close attention to your symptoms, because heart failure can worsen suddenly. Your provider may suggest a cardiac rehabilitation program to help you learn how to manage your condition.

Can heart failure be prevented?

You may be able to prevent or delay heart failure if you:

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History