ICD-10-CM Code I25.110

Atherosclerotic heart disease of native coronary artery with unstable angina pectoris

Version 2020 Billable Code Adult Diagnoses Cardiology

Valid for Submission

I25.110 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of atherosclerotic heart disease of native coronary artery with unstable angina pectoris. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code I25.110 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like angina co-occurrent and due to coronary arteriosclerosis or preinfarction syndrome or unstable angina co-occurrent and due to coronary arteriosclerosis.

The code I25.110 is applicable to adult patients aged 15 through 124 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a patient outside the stated age range.

The code is commonly used in cardiology medical specialties to specify clinical concepts such as selected atherosclerosis, ischemia, and infarction.

ICD-10:I25.110
Short Description:Athscl heart disease of native cor art w unstable ang pctrs
Long Description:Atherosclerotic heart disease of native coronary artery with unstable angina pectoris

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code I25.110:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • unstable angina without atherosclerotic heart disease I20.0

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code I25.110 are found in the index:


Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Adult diagnoses - Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Angina co-occurrent and due to coronary arteriosclerosis
  • Preinfarction syndrome
  • Unstable angina co-occurrent and due to coronary arteriosclerosis

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code I25.110 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 302 - ATHEROSCLEROSIS WITH MCC
  • 303 - ATHEROSCLEROSIS WITHOUT MCC

Convert I25.110 to ICD-9

  • 414.01 - Crnry athrscl natve vssl (Combination Flag)
  • 411.1 - Intermed coronary synd (Combination Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Ischemic heart diseases (I20-I25)
      • Chronic ischemic heart disease (I25)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body.

Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including

  • Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack.
  • Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke.
  • Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections.

Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency.

A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women.

CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage.

Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body. Arrhythmias are changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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