ICD-10 Code H44.609

Unspecified retained (old) intraocular foreign body, magnetic, unspecified eye

Version 2019 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

H44.609 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of unspecified retained (old) intraocular foreign body, magnetic, unspecified eye. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: H44.609
Short Description:Unsp retained (old) intraocular fb, magnetic, unsp eye
Long Description:Unspecified retained (old) intraocular foreign body, magnetic, unspecified eye

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00–H59)
    • Disorders of vitreous body and globe (H43-H44)
      • Disorders of globe (H44)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code H44.609 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 124 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITH MCC
  • 125 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITHOUT MCC

Convert H44.609 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 360.50 - Old magnet fb, eye NOS (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Magnetic foreign body penetrating eyeball
  • Old intraocular magnetic foreign body
  • Retained magnetic intraocular foreign body

Information for Patients


Eye Injuries

The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work in certain jobs, you may need protection.

The most common type of injury happens when something irritates the outer surface of your eye. Certain jobs such as industrial jobs or hobbies such as carpentry make this type of injury more likely. It's also more likely if you wear contact lenses.

Chemicals or heat can burn your eyes. With chemicals, the pain may cause you to close your eyes. This traps the irritant next to the eye and may cause more damage. You should wash out your eye right away while you wait for medical help.

  • Corneal injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye - foreign object in (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye emergencies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hyphema (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Foreign Bodies

If you've ever gotten a splinter or had sand in your eye, you've had experience with a foreign body. A foreign body is something that is stuck inside you but isn't supposed to be there. You may inhale or swallow a foreign body, or you may get one from an injury to almost any part of your body. Foreign bodies are more common in small children, who sometimes stick things in their mouths, ears, and noses.

Some foreign bodies, like a small splinter, do not cause serious harm. Inhaled or swallowed foreign bodies may cause choking or bowel obstruction and may require medical care.

  • Bezoar (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye - foreign object in (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foreign body in the nose (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foreign object - inhaled or swallowed (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Splinter removal (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.