ICD-10-CM Code H44.023

Vitreous abscess (chronic), bilateral

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

H44.023 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of vitreous abscess (chronic), bilateral. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:H44.023
Short Description:Vitreous abscess (chronic), bilateral
Long Description:Vitreous abscess (chronic), bilateral

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code H44.023 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 121 - ACUTE MAJOR EYE INFECTIONS WITH CC/MCC
  • 122 - ACUTE MAJOR EYE INFECTIONS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert H44.023 to ICD-9

  • 360.04 - Vitreous abscess (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00–H59)
    • Disorders of vitreous body and globe (H43-H44)
      • Disorders of globe (H44)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Abscess

An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • Intra-abdominal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pancreatic abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • Pyogenic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Retropharyngeal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Skin abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subareolar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tooth abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Eye Infections

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are

  • Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye - a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.

Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.

  • Blepharitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Corneal ulcers and infections (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cytomegalovirus retinitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dacryoadenitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Endophthalmitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye burning - itching and discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye redness (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meibomianitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Orbital cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Parinaud oculoglandular syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Periorbital cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]