H40.62X2 - Glaucoma secondary to drugs, left eye, moderate stage

Version 2023
ICD-10:H40.62X2
Short Description:Glaucoma secondary to drugs, left eye, moderate stage
Long Description:Glaucoma secondary to drugs, left eye, moderate stage
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:

H40.62X2 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of glaucoma secondary to drugs, left eye, moderate stage. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
H40.62X2365.31 - Glauc stage-ster induced
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.
H40.62X2365.32 - Glauc resid-ster induced
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.
H40.62X2365.31 - Glauc stage-ster induced
Combination Flag - Multiple codes are needed to describe the source diagnosis code. Correct coding should be done based on contextual judgment.
H40.62X2365.32 - Glauc resid-ster induced
Combination Flag - Multiple codes are needed to describe the source diagnosis code. Correct coding should be done based on contextual judgment.
H40.62X2365.72 - Moderate stage glaucoma
Combination Flag - Multiple codes are needed to describe the source diagnosis code. Correct coding should be done based on contextual judgment.

Patient Education


Drug Reactions

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions, such as drug interactions, side effects, and allergies.

What is a drug interaction?

A drug interaction is a change in the way a drug acts in the body when taken with certain other drugs, foods, or supplements or when taken while you have certain medical conditions. Examples include:

Interactions could cause a drug to be more or less effective, cause side effects, or change the way one or both drugs work.

What are side effects?

Side effects are unwanted, usually unpleasant, effects caused by medicines. Most are mild, such as a stomachache, dry mouth, or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the medicine. Others can be more serious. Sometimes a drug can interact with a disease that you have and cause a side effect. For example, if you have a heart condition, certain decongestants can cause you to have a rapid heartbeat.

What are drug allergies?

Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can range from mild to life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type. Anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction, is less common.

How can I stay safe when taking medicines?

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medicine, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medicines, foods, and supplements you need to avoid. Always talk to your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions about your medicines.


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Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye's optic nerve. It is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. It usually happens when the fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises, damaging the optic nerve. Often there are no symptoms at first. Without treatment, people with glaucoma will slowly lose their peripheral, or side vision. They seem to be looking through a tunnel. Over time, straight-ahead vision may decrease until no vision remains.

A comprehensive eye exam can tell if you have glaucoma. People at risk should get eye exams at least every two years. They include:

There is no cure, but glaucoma can usually be controlled. Early treatment can help protect your eyes against vision loss. Treatments usually include prescription eyedrops and/or surgery.

NIH: National Eye Institute


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Code History