H26.043 - Anterior subcapsular polar infantile and juvenile cataract, bilateral

Version 2023
ICD-10:H26.043
Short Description:Ant subcapsular polar infantile and juvenile cataract, bi
Long Description:Anterior subcapsular polar infantile and juvenile cataract, bilateral
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:

H26.043 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of anterior subcapsular polar infantile and juvenile cataract, bilateral. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The code H26.043 is applicable for patients aged 0 through 17 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a patient outside the stated age range.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
H26.043366.01 - Ant subcaps pol cataract
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Patient Education


Cataract

A cataract is a clouding of the lens in your eye. It affects your vision. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery.

A cataract can occur in either or both eyes. It cannot spread from one eye to the other. Common symptoms are:

Cataracts usually develop slowly. New glasses, brighter lighting, anti-glare sunglasses or magnifying lenses can help at first. Surgery is also an option. It involves removing the cloudy lens and replacing it with an artificial lens. Wearing sunglasses and a hat with a brim to block ultraviolet sunlight may help to delay cataracts.

NIH: National Eye Institute


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Code History