2021 ICD-10-CM Code H01.12

Discoid lupus erythematosus of eyelid

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

H01.12 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus of eyelid. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

ICD-10:H01.12
Short Description:Discoid lupus erythematosus of eyelid
Long Description:Discoid lupus erythematosus of eyelid

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Discoid lupus erythematosus of eyelid

Non-specific codes like H01.12 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for discoid lupus erythematosus of eyelid:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.121 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of right upper eyelid
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.122 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of right lower eyelid
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.123 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of right eye, unspecified eyelid
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.124 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of left upper eyelid
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.125 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of left lower eyelid
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.126 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of left eye, unspecified eyelid
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use H01.129 for Discoid lupus erythematosus of unspecified eye, unspecified eyelid

Information for Patients


Eyelid Disorders

Your eyelids help protect your eyes. When you blink, your eyelids spread moisture over your eyes. Blinking also helps move dirt or other particles off the surface of the eye. You close your eyelids when you see something coming toward your eyes. This can help protect against injuries.

Like most other parts of your body, your eyelids can get infected, inflamed, or even develop cancer. There are also specific eyelid problems, including

Treatment of eyelid problems depends on the cause.


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Lupus

Also called: Discoid lupus, SLE, Subacute cutaneous lupus, Systemic lupus erythematosus

What is lupus?

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage many parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, blood vessels, and brain.

There are several kinds of lupus

What causes lupus?

The cause of lupus is not known.

Who is at risk for lupus?

Anyone can get lupus, but women are most at risk. Lupus is two to three times more common in African American women than in Caucasian women. It's also more common in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. African American and Hispanic women are more likely to have severe forms of lupus.

What are the symptoms of lupus?

Lupus can have many symptoms, and they differ from person to person. Some of the more common ones are

Symptoms may come and go. When you are having symptoms, it is called a flare. Flares can range from mild to severe. New symptoms may appear at any time.

How is lupus diagnosed?

There is no single test to diagnose lupus, and it's often mistaken for other diseases. So it may take months or years for a doctor to diagnose it. Your doctor may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

What are the treatments for lupus?

There is no cure for lupus, but medicines and lifestyle changes can help control it.

People with lupus often need to see different doctors. You will have a primary care doctor and a rheumatologist (a doctor who specializes in the diseases of joints and muscles). Which other specialists you see depends on how lupus affects your body. For example, if lupus damages your heart or blood vessels, you would see a cardiologist.

Your primary care doctor should coordinate care between your different health care providers and treat other problems as they come up. Your doctor will develop a treatment plan to fit your needs. You and your doctor should review the plan often to be sure it is working. You should report new symptoms to your doctor right away so that your treatment plan can be changed if needed.

The goals of the treatment plan are to

Treatments may include drugs to

Besides taking medicines for lupus, you may need to take medicines for problems that are related to lupus such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or infection.

Alternative treatments are those that are not part of standard treatment. At this time, no research shows that alternative medicine can treat lupus. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help you cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. You should talk to your doctor before trying any alternative treatments.

How can I cope with lupus?

It is important to take an active role in your treatment. It helps to learn more about lupus - being able to spot the warning signs of a flare can help you prevent the flare or make the symptoms less severe.

It is also important to find ways to cope with the stress of having lupus. Exercising and finding ways to relax may make it easier for you to cope. A good support system can also help.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)