ICD-10-CM Code G93.3

Postviral fatigue syndrome

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

G93.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of postviral fatigue syndrome. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code G93.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like c/o - postviral syndrome or neurological symptom or postviral excessive daytime sleepiness or postviral fatigue syndrome.

ICD-10:G93.3
Short Description:Postviral fatigue syndrome
Long Description:Postviral fatigue syndrome

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G93.3:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • chronic fatigue syndrome NOS R53.82

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G93.3 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • C/O - postviral syndrome
  • Neurological symptom
  • Postviral excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Postviral fatigue syndrome

Clinical Information

  • FATIGUE SYNDROME CHRONIC-. a syndrome characterized by persistent or recurrent fatigue diffuse musculoskeletal pain sleep disturbances and subjective cognitive impairment of 6 months duration or longer. symptoms are not caused by ongoing exertion; are not relieved by rest; and result in a substantial reduction of previous levels of occupational educational social or personal activities. minor alterations of immune neuroendocrine and autonomic function may be associated with this syndrome. there is also considerable overlap between this condition and fibromyalgia. from semin neurol 1998;182:237 42; ann intern med 1994 dec 15;12112: 953 9

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code G93.3 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 947 - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS WITH MCC
  • 948 - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS WITHOUT MCC

Convert G93.3 to ICD-9

  • 780.79 - Malaise and fatigue NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Other disorders of the nervous system (G89-G99)
      • Other disorders of brain (G93)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

What is chronic fatigue syndrome?

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a serious, long-term illness that affects many body systems. Another name for it is myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). CFS can often make you unable to do your usual activities. Sometimes you may not even be able to get out of bed.

What causes chronic fatigue syndrome?

Scientists don't know what causes CFS. There may be more than one thing that causes it. It is possible that two or more triggers might work together to cause the illness.

Who is at risk for chronic fatigue syndrome?

Anyone can get CFS, but it is most common in people between 40 and 60 years old. Adult women have it more often that adult men. Whites are more likely than other races to get a diagnosis of CFS, but many people with CFS have not been diagnosed with it.

What are the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome?

CFS symptoms can include

  • Severe fatigue that is not improved by rest
  • Sleep problems
  • Post-exertional malaise (PEM), where your symptoms get worse after any physical or mental activity
  • Problems with thinking and concentrating
  • Pain
  • Dizziness

CFS can be unpredictable. Your symptoms may come and go. They may change over time - sometimes they might get better, and other times they may get worse.

How is chronic fatigue syndrome diagnosed?

CFS can be difficult to diagnose. There are no tests for it, and other illnesses can cause similar symptoms. Your health care provider has to rule out other diseases before making a diagnosis of CFS. He or she will do a thorough medical exam, including

  • Asking about your medical history and your family's medical history
  • Asking about your current illness, including your symptoms. Your doctor will want to know how often you have symptoms, how bad they are, how long they have lasted, and how they affect your life.
  • A thorough physical and mental status exam
  • Blood, urine or other tests

What are the treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome?

There is no cure or approved treatment for CFS, but you may be able to treat or manage some of your symptoms. You, your family, and your health care provider should work together to decide on a plan. You should figure out which symptom causes the most problems, and try to treat that first. For example, if sleep problems affect you the most, you might first try using good sleep habits. If those do not help, you may need to take medicines or see a sleep specialist.

Strategies such as learning new ways to manage activity can also be helpful. You need to make sure that you do not "push and crash." This can happen when you feel better, do too much, and then get worse again.

Since the process of developing a treatment plan and attending to self-care can be hard if you have CFS, it is important to have support from family members and friends.

Don't try any new treatments without talking to your health care provider. Some treatments that are promoted as cures for CFS are unproven, often costly, and could be dangerous.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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