ICD-10-CM Code G56.0

Carpal tunnel syndrome

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

G56.0 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:G56.0
Short Description:Carpal tunnel syndrome
Long Description:Carpal tunnel syndrome

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • G56.00 - ... unspecified upper limb
  • G56.01 - ... right upper limb
  • G56.02 - ... left upper limb
  • G56.03 - ... bilateral upper limbs

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G56.0 are found in the index:


Clinical Information

  • CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME-. entrapment of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the carpal bones. this syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma cumulative trauma disorders; wrist injuries; amyloid neuropathies; rheumatoid arthritis see arthritis rheumatoid; acromegaly; pregnancy; and other conditions. symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. joynt clinical neurology 1995 ch51 p45

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Nerve, nerve root and plexus disorders (G50-G59)
      • Mononeuropathies of upper limb (G56)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

You're working at your desk, trying to ignore the tingling or numbness you've had for some time in your hand and wrist. Suddenly, a sharp, piercing pain shoots through the wrist and up your arm. Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome.

The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones at the base of your hand. It contains nerve and tendons. Sometimes, thickening from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms usually start gradually. As they worsen, grasping objects can become difficult.

Often, the cause is having a smaller carpal tunnel than other people do. Other causes include performing assembly line work, wrist injury, or swelling due to certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Women are three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men.

Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent permanent nerve damage. Your doctor diagnoses carpal tunnel syndrome with a physical exam and special nerve tests. Treatment includes resting your hand, splints, pain and anti-inflammatory medicines, and sometimes surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


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