ICD-10-CM Code G31.83

Dementia with Lewy bodies

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

G31.83 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of dementia with lewy bodies. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code G31.83 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like abnormal behavior, dementia associated with parkinson's disease, diffuse lewy body disease, diffuse lewy body disease with spongiform cortical change, lewy body dementia with behavioral disturbance, parkinsonism with dementia of guadeloupe, etc

ICD-10:G31.83
Short Description:Dementia with Lewy bodies
Long Description:Dementia with Lewy bodies

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G31.83:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Dementia with Parkinsonism
  • Lewy body dementia
  • Lewy body disease

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G31.83 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Abnormal behavior
  • Dementia associated with Parkinson's Disease
  • Diffuse Lewy body disease
  • Diffuse Lewy body disease with spongiform cortical change
  • Lewy body dementia with behavioral disturbance
  • Parkinsonism with dementia of Guadeloupe
  • Senile dementia of the Lewy body type

Convert G31.83 to ICD-9

  • 331.82 - Dementia w Lewy bodies

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Other degenerative diseases of the nervous system (G30-G32)
      • Oth degenerative diseases of nervous system, NEC (G31)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Lewy Body Disease

Also called: Dementia with Lewy bodies

Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss of mental functions severe enough to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, build up in areas of the brain. The disease may cause a wide range of symptoms, including

  • Changes in alertness and attention
  • Hallucinations
  • Problems with movement and posture
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of memory

Lewy body disease can be hard to diagnose, because Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease cause similar symptoms. Scientists think that Lewy body disease might be related to these diseases, or that they sometimes happen together.

Lewy body disease usually begins between the ages of 50 and 85. The disease gets worse over time. There is no cure. Treatment focuses on drugs to help symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


[Learn More]

Dementia with Lewy bodies Dementia with Lewy bodies is a nervous system disorder characterized by a decline in intellectual function (dementia), a group of movement problems known as parkinsonism, visual hallucinations, sudden changes (fluctuations) in behavior and intellectual ability, and acting out dreams while asleep (REM sleep behavior disorder). This condition typically affects older adults, most often developing between ages 50 and 85. The life expectancy of individuals with dementia with Lewy bodies varies; people typically survive about 5 to 7 years after they are diagnosed.REM sleep behavior disorder may be the first sign of dementia with Lewy bodies. It can occur years before other symptoms appear. Individuals with REM sleep behavior disorder act out their dreams, talking and moving in their sleep when they should be still. This behavior becomes less pronounced as dementia with Lewy bodies worsens and additional features develop.Dementia is often the second major feature to develop in dementia with Lewy bodies. Initially, this intellectual decline may be mild or seem to come and go. In this condition, dementia often leads to impaired ability to perform visual-spatial tasks such as assembling puzzles. Affected individuals may also have poor problem-solving skills (executive functioning), speech difficulties, and reduced inhibitions. Problems with memory typically do not occur until later.Most people with dementia with Lewy bodies experience visual hallucinations, which often involve people or animals. Fluctuations in behavior and thought processes (cognition) include sudden changes in attention, unintelligible speech, and brief episodes of altered consciousness that may appear as staring spells.Parkinsonism is usually the last major feature to develop in people with dementia with Lewy bodies, although it can appear earlier in some individuals. The movement problems typically include tremors, rigidity, unusually slow movement (bradykinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). Affected individuals may require walking aids or wheelchair assistance over time.Individuals with dementia with Lewy bodies may also experience a sharp drop in blood pressure upon standing (orthostatic hypotension), fainting episodes (syncope), reduced sense of smell, increased saliva production and drooling, difficulty controlling the flow of urine (incontinence), or constipation.
[Learn More]