ICD-10-CM Code G25.1

Drug-induced tremor

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

G25.1 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of drug-induced tremor. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code G25.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like halothane shakes or medication-induced postural tremor or tremor due to substance abuse or tremor opiophagorum.

ICD-10:G25.1
Short Description:Drug-induced tremor
Long Description:Drug-induced tremor

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G25.1:

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code for adverse effect, if applicable, to identify drug T36 T50

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G25.1 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Halothane shakes
  • Medication-induced postural tremor
  • Tremor due to substance abuse
  • Tremor opiophagorum

Convert G25.1 to ICD-9

  • 333.1 - Tremor NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Extrapyramidal and movement disorders (G20-G26)
      • Other extrapyramidal and movement disorders (G25)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Tremor

Tremors are unintentional trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body. Most tremors occur in the hands. You can also have arm, head, face, vocal cord, trunk, and leg tremors. Tremors are most common in middle-aged and older people, but anyone can have them.

The cause of tremors is a problem in the parts of the brain that control muscles in the body or in specific parts of the body, such as the hands. They commonly occur in otherwise healthy people. They may also be caused by problems such as

  • Parkinson's disease
  • Dystonia
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Stroke
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Alcohol abuse and withdrawal
  • Certain medicines

Some forms are inherited and run in families. Others have no known cause.

There is no cure for most tremors. Treatment to relieve them depends on their cause. In many cases, medicines and sometimes surgical procedures can reduce or stop tremors and improve muscle control. Tremors are not life-threatening. However, they can be embarrassing and make it hard to perform daily tasks.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Essential tremor (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tremor (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tremor - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)

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