2021 ICD-10-CM Code G12.1

Other inherited spinal muscular atrophy

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

G12.1 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other inherited spinal muscular atrophy. The code G12.1 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code G12.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like adult spinal muscular atrophy, autosomal dominant adult-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy, autosomal dominant congenital benign spinal muscular atrophy, autosomal recessive distal spinal muscular atrophy type 3, congenital anterior polar cataract , dandy-walker syndrome, etc.

ICD-10:G12.1
Short Description:Other inherited spinal muscular atrophy
Long Description:Other inherited spinal muscular atrophy

Code Classification

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G12.1:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G12.1 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert G12.1 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code G12.1 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Also called: SMA

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. As the neurons die, the muscles weaken. This can affect walking, crawling, breathing, swallowing, and head and neck control.

SMA runs in families. Parents usually have no symptoms, but still carry the gene. Genetic counseling is important if the disease runs in your family.

There are many types of SMA. Some of them are fatal. Some people have a normal life expectancy. It depends on the type and how it affects breathing. There is no cure. Treatments help with symptoms and prevent complications. They may include machines to help with breathing, nutritional support, physical therapy, and medicines.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Spinal muscular atrophy Spinal muscular atrophy is a genetic disorder characterized by weakness and wasting (atrophy) in muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). It is caused by a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons that control muscle movement. The weakness tends to be more severe in the muscles that are close to the center of the body (proximal) compared to muscles away from the body's center (distal). The muscle weakness usually worsens with age. There are many types of spinal muscular atrophy that are caused by changes in the same genes. The types differ in age of onset and severity of muscle weakness; however, there is overlap between the types. Other forms of spinal muscular atrophy and related motor neuron diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy, spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance, X-linked infantile spinal muscular atrophy, and spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 are caused by mutations in other genes.Spinal muscular atrophy type 0 is evident before birth and is the rarest and most severe form of the condition. Affected infants move less in the womb, and as a result they are often born with joint deformities (contractures). They have extremely weak muscle tone (hypotonia) at birth. Their respiratory muscles are very weak and they often do not survive past infancy due to respiratory failure. Some infants with spinal muscular atrophy type 0 also have heart defects that are present from birth (congenital).Spinal muscular atrophy type I (also called Werdnig-Hoffmann disease) is the most common form of the condition. It is a severe form of the disorder with muscle weakness evident at birth or within the first few months of life. Most affected children cannot control their head movements or sit unassisted. Children with this type may have swallowing problems that can lead to difficulty feeding and poor growth. They can also have breathing problems due to weakness of respiratory muscles and an abnormally bell-shaped chest that prevents the lungs from fully expanding. Most children with spinal muscular atrophy type I do not survive past early childhood due to respiratory failure.Spinal muscular atrophy type II (also called Dubowitz disease) is characterized by muscle weakness that develops in children between ages 6 and 12 months. Children with this type can sit without support, although they may need help getting to a seated position. However, as the muscle weakness worsens later in childhood, affected individuals may need support to sit. Individuals with spinal muscular atrophy type II cannot stand or walk unaided. They often have involuntary trembling (tremors) in their fingers, a spine that curves side-to-side (scoliosis), and respiratory muscle weakness that can be life-threatening. The life span of individuals with spinal muscular atrophy type II varies, but many people with this condition live into their twenties or thirties.Spinal muscular atrophy type III (also called Kugelberg-Welander disease) typically causes muscle weakness after early childhood. Individuals with this condition can stand and walk unaided, but over time, walking and climbing stairs may become increasingly difficult. Many affected individuals require wheelchair assistance later in life. People with spinal muscular atrophy type III typically have a normal life expectancy.Spinal muscular atrophy type IV is rare and often begins in early adulthood. Affected individuals usually experience mild to moderate muscle weakness, tremors, and mild breathing problems. People with spinal muscular atrophy type IV have a normal life expectancy.
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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)