2022 ICD-10-CM Code G11.4

Hereditary spastic paraplegia

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:G11.4
Short Description:Hereditary spastic paraplegia
Long Description:Hereditary spastic paraplegia

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Systemic atrophies primarily affecting the central nervous system (G10-G14)
      • Hereditary ataxia (G11)

G11.4 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. The code G11.4 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code G11.4 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia, autosomal dominant spastic ataxia type 1, autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 10, autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 12, autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 13 , autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 17, etc.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G11.4 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert G11.4 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code G11.4 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Neuromuscular Disorders

Neuromuscular disorders affect your neuromuscular system. They can cause problems with

These disorders can cause your muscles to become weak and waste away. You may also have symptoms such as spasms, twitching, and pain.

Examples of neuromuscular disorders include

There can be different causes for these diseases. Many of them are genetic.This means they are inherited (run in families) or are caused by a new mutation in your genes. Some neuromuscular disorders are autoimmune diseases. Sometimes the cause is unknown.

Many neuromuscular diseases have no cure. But treatments may improve symptoms, increase mobility, and lengthen life.


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Paralysis

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.

Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. Other causes of paralysis include

Polio used to be a cause of paralysis, but polio no longer occurs in the U.S.


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Silver syndrome

Silver syndrome belongs to a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and, frequently, development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. Both types involve the lower limbs; the complex types may also involve the upper limbs, although to a lesser degree. In addition, the complex types may affect the brain and parts of the nervous system involved in muscle movement and sensations. Silver syndrome is a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

The first sign of Silver syndrome is usually weakness in the muscles of the hands. These muscles waste away (amyotrophy), resulting in abnormal positioning of the thumbs and difficulty using the fingers and hands for tasks such as handwriting. People with Silver syndrome often have high-arched feet (pes cavus) and spasticity in the legs. The signs and symptoms of Silver syndrome typically begin in late childhood but can start anytime from early childhood to late adulthood. The muscle problems associated with Silver syndrome slowly worsen with age, but affected individuals can remain active throughout life.


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Spastic paraplegia type 11

Spastic paraplegia type 11 is part of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve the lower limbs. The complex types involve the lower limbs and can affect the upper limbs to a lesser degree. Complex spastic paraplegias also affect the structure or functioning of the brain and the peripheral nervous system, which consists of nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound. Spastic paraplegia type 11 is a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

Like all hereditary spastic paraplegias, spastic paraplegia type 11 involves spasticity of the leg muscles and muscle weakness. In almost all individuals with this type of spastic paraplegia, the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum) is abnormally thin. People with this form of spastic paraplegia can also experience numbness, tingling, or pain in the arms and legs (sensory neuropathy); disturbance in the nerves used for muscle movement (motor neuropathy); intellectual disability; exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) of the lower limbs; speech difficulties (dysarthria); reduced bladder control; and muscle wasting (amyotrophy). Less common features include difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), high-arched feet (pes cavus), an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis), and involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus). The onset of symptoms varies greatly; however, abnormalities in muscle tone and difficulty walking usually become noticeable in adolescence.

Many features of spastic paraplegia type 11 are progressive. Most people experience a decline in intellectual ability and an increase in muscle weakness and nerve abnormalities over time. As the condition progresses, some people require wheelchair assistance.


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Spastic paraplegia type 15

Spastic paraplegia type 15 is part of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Spastic paraplegia type 15 is classified as a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia because it involves all four limbs as well as additional features, including abnormalities of the brain. In addition to the muscles and brain, spastic paraplegia type 15 affects the peripheral nervous system, which consists of nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound.

Spastic paraplegia type 15 usually becomes apparent in childhood or adolescence with the development of weak muscle tone (hypotonia), difficulty walking, or intellectual disability. In almost all affected individuals, the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum) is abnormally thin and becomes thinner over time. Additionally, there is often a loss (atrophy) of nerve cells in several parts of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, which controls thinking and emotions, and the cerebellum, which coordinates movement.

People with this form of spastic paraplegia can have numbness, tingling, or pain in the arms and legs (sensory neuropathy); impairment of the nerves used for muscle movement (motor neuropathy); exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) of the lower limbs; muscle wasting (amyotrophy); or reduced bladder control. Rarely, spastic paraplegia type 15 is associated with a group of movement abnormalities called parkinsonism, which includes tremors, rigidity, and unusually slow movement (bradykinesia). People with spastic paraplegia type 15 may have an eye condition called pigmentary maculopathy that often impairs vision. This condition results from the breakdown (degeneration) of tissue at the back of the eye called the macula, which is responsible for sharp central vision.

Most people with spastic paraplegia type 15 experience a decline in intellectual ability and an increase in muscle weakness and nerve abnormalities over time. As the condition progresses, many people require walking aids or wheelchair assistance in adulthood.


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Spastic paraplegia type 2

Spastic paraplegia type 2 is part of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve the lower limbs. The complex types involve the lower limbs and can also affect the upper limbs to a lesser degree; the structure or functioning of the brain; and the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound (the peripheral nervous system). Spastic paraplegia type 2 can occur in either the pure or complex form.

People with the pure form of spastic paraplegia type 2 experience spasticity in the lower limbs, usually without any additional features. People with the complex form of spastic paraplegia type 2 have lower limb spasticity and can also experience problems with movement and balance (ataxia); involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus); mild intellectual disability; involuntary, rhythmic shaking (tremor); and degeneration (atrophy) of the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Symptoms usually become apparent between the ages of 1 and 5 years; those affected are typically able to walk and have a normal lifespan.


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Spastic paraplegia type 31

Spastic paraplegia type 31 is one of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia) caused by degeneration of nerve cells that trigger muscle movement (motor neurons). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complicated. The pure types involve only the lower limbs, while the complicated types also involve the upper limbs and other areas of the body, including the brain. Spastic paraplegia type 31 is usually a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia, although a few complicated cases have been reported.

The first signs and symptoms of spastic paraplegia type 31 usually appear before age 20 or after age 30. An early feature is difficulty walking due to spasticity and weakness, which typically affect both legs equally. People with spastic paraplegia type 31 can also experience progressive muscle wasting (amyotrophy) in the lower limbs, exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), a decreased ability to feel vibrations, reduced bladder control, and high-arched feet (pes cavus). As the condition progresses, some individuals require walking support.


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Spastic paraplegia type 3A

Spastic paraplegia type 3A is one of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by muscle stiffness (spasticity) and weakness in the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are often divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve only the lower limbs, while the complex types also involve other areas of the body; additional features can include changes in vision, changes in intellectual functioning, difficulty walking, and disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy). Spastic paraplegia type 3A is usually a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia, although a few complex cases have been reported.

In addition to spasticity and weakness, which typically affect both legs equally, people with spastic paraplegia type 3A can also experience progressive muscle wasting (amyotrophy) in the lower limbs, reduced bladder control, an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis), loss of sensation in the feet (peripheral neuropathy), or high arches of the feet (pes cavus). The signs and symptoms of spastic paraplegia type 3A usually appear before the age of 10; the average age of onset is 4 years. In some affected individuals the condition slowly worsens over time, sometimes leading to a need for walking support.


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Spastic paraplegia type 4

Spastic paraplegia type 4 (also known as SPG4) is the most common of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) in the legs and difficulty walking. Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types generally involve only spasticity of the lower limbs and walking difficulties. The complex types involve more widespread problems with the nervous system; the structure or functioning of the brain; and the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound (the peripheral nervous system). In complex forms, there can also be features outside of the nervous system. Spastic paraplegia type 4 is usually a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia, although a few complex cases have been reported.

Like all hereditary spastic paraplegias, spastic paraplegia type 4 involves spasticity of the leg muscles and muscle weakness. People with this condition can also experience exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), ankle spasms, high-arched feet (pes cavus), and reduced bladder control. Spastic paraplegia type 4 generally affects nerve and muscle function in the lower half of the body only.


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Spastic paraplegia type 5A

Spastic paraplegia type 5A is one of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by muscle stiffness (spasticity) and severe weakness in the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are often divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve spasticity and weakness only in the lower limbs, while the complex types involve additional problems with other areas of the body; additional features can include changes in vision, changes in intellectual functioning, brain abnormalities, and disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy). Spastic paraplegia type 5A is usually a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia, although complex type features have been reported in some individuals, usually in those who have had the condition for many years.

In addition to spasticity and weakness, people with spastic paraplegia type 5A can lose the ability to sense the position of their limbs or detect vibrations with their lower limbs. They may also have muscle wasting (amyotrophy), reduced bladder control, or high arches of the feet (pes cavus). The signs and symptoms of spastic paraplegia type 5A usually appear in adolescence but can begin at any time between infancy and mid-adulthood. The condition slowly worsens over time, often leading affected individuals to require walking support or wheelchair assistance.


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Spastic paraplegia type 7

Spastic paraplegia type 7 (also called SPG7) is one of more than 80 genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders primarily affect the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system), specifically nerve cells (neurons) that extend down the spinal cord. These neurons are used for muscle movement and sensation. Signs and symptoms of hereditary spastic paraplegias are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) in the legs and difficulty walking. 

Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types generally involve only spasticity of the lower limbs and walking difficulties. The complex types involve more widespread problems with the nervous system; the structure or functioning of the brain; and the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound (the peripheral nervous system). In complex forms, there can also be features outside of the nervous system. Spastic paraplegia type 7 can occur in either the pure or complex form.

Like all hereditary spastic paraplegias, spastic paraplegia type 7 involves spasticity of the leg muscles and some muscle weakness. People with this form of spastic paraplegia can also have ataxia; a pattern of movement abnormalities known as parkinsonism; exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) in the arms; speech difficulties (dysarthria); difficulty swallowing (dysphagia); involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus); mild hearing loss; abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis); high-arched feet (pes cavus); numbness, tingling, or pain in the arms and legs (sensory neuropathy); disturbance in the nerves used for muscle movement (motor neuropathy); and muscle wasting (amyotrophy). The onset of symptoms varies greatly among those with spastic paraplegia type 7; however, abnormalities in muscle tone and other features usually become noticeable in adulthood.


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Spastic paraplegia type 8

Spastic paraplegia type 8 is part of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve only the nerves and muscles controlling the lower limbs and bladder, whereas the complex types also have significant involvement of the nervous system in other parts of the body. Spastic paraplegia type 8 is a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia.

Like all hereditary spastic paraplegias, spastic paraplegia type 8 involves spasticity of the leg muscles and muscle weakness. People with this condition can also experience exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), a decreased ability to feel vibrations, muscle wasting (amyotrophy), and reduced bladder control. The signs and symptoms of spastic paraplegia type 8 usually appear in early to mid-adulthood. As the muscle weakness and spasticity get worse, some people may need the aid of a cane, walker, or wheelchair.


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Troyer syndrome

Troyer syndrome is part of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve the lower limbs. The complex types involve the lower limbs and can also affect the upper limbs to a lesser degree; the structure or functioning of the brain; and the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound (the peripheral nervous system). Troyer syndrome is a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

People with Troyer syndrome can experience a variety of signs and symptoms. The most common characteristics of Troyer syndrome are spasticity of the leg muscles, progressive muscle weakness, paraplegia, muscle wasting in the hands and feet (distal amyotrophy), small stature, developmental delay, learning disorders, speech difficulties (dysarthria), and mood swings. Other characteristics can include exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) in the lower limbs, uncontrollable movements of the limbs (choreoathetosis), skeletal abnormalities, and a bending outward (valgus) of the knees.

Troyer syndrome causes the degeneration and death of muscle cells and motor neurons (specialized nerve cells that control muscle movement) throughout a person's lifetime, leading to a slow progressive decline in muscle and nerve function. The severity of impairment related to Troyer syndrome increases as a person ages. Most affected individuals require a wheelchair by the time they are in their fifties or sixties.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)