2024 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G11.3

Cerebellar ataxia with defective DNA repair

ICD-10-CM Code:
G11.3
ICD-10 Code for:
Cerebellar ataxia with defective DNA repair
Is Billable?
Yes - Valid for Submission
Chronic Condition Indicator: [1]
Chronic
Code Navigator:

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system
    (G00–G99)
    • Systemic atrophies primarily affecting the central nervous system
      (G10-G14)
      • Hereditary ataxia
        (G11)

G11.3 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia with defective dna repair. The code is valid during the current fiscal year for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions from October 01, 2023 through September 30, 2024.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Ataxia telangiectasia variant
  • Ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome
  • Chorea due to ataxia telangiectasia syndrome
  • Chorea due to immunological disorder
  • Dystonia due to ataxia telangiectasia syndrome

Clinical Classification

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The following annotation back-references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index. The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10-CM code(s).

Convert G11.3 to ICD-9-CM

  • ICD-9-CM Code: 334.8 - Spinocerebellar dis NEC
    Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Patient Education


Cerebellar Disorders

When you play the piano or hit a tennis ball you are activating the cerebellum. The cerebellum is the area of the brain that controls coordination and balance. Problems with the cerebellum include:

  • Cancer
  • Genetic disorders
  • Ataxias - failure of muscle control in the arms and legs that result in movement disorders
  • Degeneration - disorders caused by brain cells decreasing in size or wasting away

Treatment of cerebellar disorders depends on the cause. In some cases, there is no cure but treatment may help with symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Movement Disorders

Movement disorders are neurologic conditions that cause problems with movement, such as:

  • Increased movement that can be voluntary (intentional) or involuntary (unintended)
  • Decreased or slow voluntary movement

There are many different movement disorders. Some of the more common types include:

  • Ataxia, the loss of muscle coordination
  • Dystonia, in which involuntary contractions of your muscles cause twisting and repetitive movements. The movements can be painful.
  • Huntington's disease, an inherited disease that causes nerve cells in certain parts of the brain to waste away. This includes the nerve cells that help to control voluntary movement.
  • Parkinson's disease, which is disorder that slowly gets worse over time. It causes tremors, slowness of movement, and trouble walking.
  • Tourette syndrome, a condition which causes people to make sudden twitches, movements, or sounds (tics)
  • Tremor and essential tremor, which cause involuntary trembling or shaking movements. The movements may be in one or more parts of your body.

Causes of movement disorders include:

  • Genetics
  • Infections
  • Medicines
  • Damage to the brain, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves
  • Metabolic disorders
  • Stroke and vascular diseases
  • Toxins

Treatment varies by disorder. Medicines can cure some disorders. Others get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and relieve pain.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2024 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2023 through 9/30/2024
  • FY 2023 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2022 through 9/30/2023
  • FY 2022 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2021 through 9/30/2022
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016. This was the first year ICD-10-CM was implemented into the HIPAA code set.

Footnotes

[1] Chronic - a chronic condition code indicates a condition lasting 12 months or longer and its effect on the patient based on one or both of the following criteria:

  • The condition results in the need for ongoing intervention with medical products,treatment, services, and special equipment
  • The condition places limitations on self-care, independent living, and social interactions.