2022 ICD-10-CM Code F31.1

Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:F31.1
Short Description:Bipolar disorder, current episode manic w/o psych features
Long Description:Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Mood [affective] disorders (F30-F39)
      • Bipolar disorder (F31)

F31.1 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Bipolar disorder, current episode manic w/o psych features

Non-specific codes like F31.1 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for bipolar disorder, current episode manic w/o psych features:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F31.10 for Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F31.11 for Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features, mild
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F31.12 for Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features, moderate
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F31.13 for Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features, severe

Information for Patients


Bipolar Disorder

What is bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder that can cause intense mood swings:

Along with the mood swings, bipolar disorder causes changes in behavior, energy levels, and activity levels.

Bipolar disorder used to be called other names, including manic depression and manic-depressive disorder.

What are the types of bipolar disorder?

There are three main types of bipolar disorder:

With any of these types, having four or more episodes of mania or depression in a year is called "rapid cycling."

What causes bipolar disorder?

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown. Several factors likely play a role in the disorder. They include genetics, brain structure and function, and your environment.

Who is at risk for bipolar disorder?

You are at higher risk for bipolar disorder if you have a close relative who has it. Going through trauma or stressful life events may raise this risk even more.

What are the symptoms of bipolar disorder?

The symptoms of bipolar disorder can vary. But they involve mood swings known as mood episodes:

Some people with bipolar disorder may have milder symptoms. For example, you may have hypomania instead of mania. With hypomania, you may feel very good and find that you can get a lot done. You may not feel like anything is wrong. But your family and friends may notice your mood swings and changes in activity levels. They may realize that your behavior is unusual for you. After the hypomania, you might have severe depression.

Your mood episodes may last a week or two or sometimes longer. During an episode, symptoms usually occur every day for most of the day.

How is bipolar disorder diagnosed?

To diagnose bipolar disorder, your health care provider may use many tools:

What are the treatments for bipolar disorder?

Treatment can help many people, including those with the most severe forms of bipolar disorder. The main treatments for bipolar disorder include medicines, psychotherapy, or both:

Bipolar disorder is a lifelong illness. But long-term, ongoing treatment can help manage your symptoms and enable you to live a healthy, successful life.

NIH: National Institute of Mental Health


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior. This disorder most often appears in late adolescence or early adulthood, although symptoms can begin at any time of life.

People with bipolar disorder experience both dramatic "highs," called manic episodes, and "lows," called depressive episodes. These episodes can last from hours to weeks, and many people have no symptoms between episodes.

Manic episodes are characterized by increased energy and activity, irritability, restlessness, an inability to sleep, and reckless behavior. Some people with bipolar disorder experience hypomanic episodes, which are similar to but less extreme than manic episodes.

Depressive episodes are marked by low energy and activity, a feeling of hopelessness, and an inability to perform everyday tasks. People with bipolar disorder often have repeated thoughts of death and suicide, and they have a much greater risk of dying by suicide than the general population.

Manic and depressive episodes can include psychotic symptoms, such as false perceptions (hallucinations) or strongly held false beliefs (delusions). Mixed episodes, which have features of manic and depressive episodes at the same time, also occur in some affected individuals.

Bipolar disorder is classified into several types based on the mood changes that occur. Bipolar I involves manic episodes, which can be accompanied by psychotic symptoms, and hypomanic or depressive episodes. Bipolar II involves hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes. Cyclothymic disorder involves hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes that are typically less severe than those in bipolar I or bipolar II.

Bipolar disorder often occurs with other mental health conditions, including anxiety disorders (such as panic attacks), behavioral disorders (such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder), and substance abuse.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)