2022 ICD-10-CM Code F25.8

Other schizoaffective disorders

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:F25.8
Short Description:Other schizoaffective disorders
Long Description:Other schizoaffective disorders

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Schizophrenia, schizotypal, delusional, and other non-mood psychotic disorders (F20-F29)
      • Schizoaffective disorders (F25)

F25.8 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other schizoaffective disorders. The code F25.8 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code F25.8 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute exacerbation of chronic schizoaffective schizophrenia, acute exacerbation of subchronic schizoaffective schizophrenia, chronic schizoaffective schizophrenia, schizoaffective schizophrenia, schizoaffective schizophrenia in remission , subchronic schizoaffective schizophrenia, etc.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code F25.8 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert F25.8 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code F25.8 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Psychotic Disorders

Psychotic disorders are severe mental disorders that cause abnormal thinking and perceptions. People with psychoses lose touch with reality. Two of the main symptoms are delusions and hallucinations. Delusions are false beliefs, such as thinking that someone is plotting against you or that the TV is sending you secret messages. Hallucinations are false perceptions, such as hearing, seeing, or feeling something that is not there.

Schizophrenia is one type of psychotic disorder. People with bipolar disorder may also have psychotic symptoms. Other problems that can cause psychosis include alcohol and some drugs, brain tumors, brain infections, and stroke.

Treatment depends on the cause of the psychosis. It might involve drugs to control symptoms and talk therapy. Hospitalization is an option for serious cases where a person might be dangerous to himself or others.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Schizoaffective disorder

Schizoaffective disorder is a mental health condition that includes features of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder such as bipolar disorder or depression. The prefix "schizo-" refers to the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia that affect a person's thinking, sense of self, and perceptions. The term "-affective" refers to extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior.

Schizoaffective disorder has a wide range of signs and symptoms that make it challenging to diagnose. Its features overlap significantly with those of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and there is debate about whether schizoaffective disorder should be considered a separate diagnosis or a subtype of one of these other conditions.

Signs and symptoms of psychosis in people with schizoaffective disorder include false perceptions called hallucinations, such as hearing voices no one else can hear or experiencing visions, smells, or tactile (touch) sensations. Strongly held false beliefs (delusions) are also a characteristic feature. For example, affected individuals may be certain that they are a particular historical figure or that they are being plotted against or controlled by others.

There are two major types of schizoaffective disorder, based on which mood disorder is involved: the bipolar type and the depressive type. The bipolar type includes both dramatic "highs," called manic episodes, and "lows," called depressive episodes. The depressive type includes only depressive episodes. Manic episodes are characterized by increased energy and activity, irritability, restlessness, an inability to sleep, and reckless behavior. Depressive episodes are marked by low energy and activity, a feeling of hopelessness, and an inability to perform everyday tasks.

The psychosis and mood problems associated with schizoaffective disorder usually become evident in adolescence or young adulthood. People with this condition often have difficulty functioning at school, at work, and in social settings. Disordered thinking and concentration, inappropriate emotional responses, erratic speech and behavior, and difficulty with personal hygiene and everyday tasks are also common. People with schizoaffective disorder have a higher risk of substance abuse problems and dying by suicide than the general population.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)