2022 ICD-10-CM Code F18.2

Inhalant dependence

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:F18.2
Short Description:Inhalant dependence
Long Description:Inhalant dependence

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F10-F19)
      • Inhalant related disorders (F18)

F18.2 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of inhalant dependence. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Inhalant dependence

Non-specific codes like F18.2 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for inhalant dependence:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.20 for Inhalant dependence, uncomplicated
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.21 for Inhalant dependence, in remission
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - F18.22 for Inhalant dependence with intoxication
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.220 for Inhalant dependence with intoxication, uncomplicated
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.221 for Inhalant dependence with intoxication delirium
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.229 for Inhalant dependence with intoxication, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.24 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced mood disorder
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - F18.25 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.250 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder with delusions
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.251 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder with hallucinations
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.259 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.27 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced dementia
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - F18.28 for Inhalant dependence with other inhalant-induced disorders
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.280 for Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced anxiety disorder
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.288 for Inhalant dependence with other inhalant-induced disorder
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F18.29 for Inhalant dependence with unspecified inhalant-induced disorder

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code F18.2:


Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Information for Patients


Inhalants

What are inhalants?

Inhalants are substances that people inhale (breathe in) to get high. There are other substances that people might inhale, such as alcohol. But those are not called inhalants, because they can also be used another way. Inhalants are the substances that you can misuse only by inhaling them.

Using inhalants to try to get high, even once, can be very harmful to your brain and body. It can even lead to death.

What are the types of inhalants?

Inhalants are often products that are easily bought and can be found in the home or workplace. They contain dangerous substances that have psychoactive (mind-altering) properties when they are inhaled. There are four main types of inhalants are

Some of the common slang terms for various inhalants include

How do people use inhalants?

People who use inhalants breathe in the fumes through their nose or mouth, usually by "sniffing," "snorting," "bagging," or "huffing." It's called different names depending on the substance and equipment used.

The high that inhalants produce usually lasts just a few minutes, so people often try to make it last by inhaling them again and again over several hours.

Who uses inhalants?

Inhalants are mostly used by young kids and teens. They often try inhalants before they try other substances because inhalants are easier to get.

What are the signs that someone is using inhalants?

Signs that someone is using inhalants include

What are the health effects of using inhalants?

Most inhalants affect your central nervous system and slow down brain activity. Inhalants can cause both short-term and long-term health effects:

Using inhalants, even once, could lead to an overdose. This can cause you to have seizures or your heart to stop. It can also be deadly.

Are inhalants addictive?

Addiction to inhalants is rare, but it can happen if you use them repeatedly. Stopping them can cause withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, problems sleeping, and mood changes.

Behavioral therapy may help people who are addicted to inhalants.

Can inhalant misuse be prevented?

To try to prevent inhalant abuse, parents should talk to their children about it. They should discuss the dangers of inhalants and how to deal with peer pressure if someone asks them to try it.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)