2021 ICD-10-CM Code E78.0

Pure hypercholesterolemia

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

E78.0 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of pure hypercholesterolemia. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

ICD-10:E78.0
Short Description:Pure hypercholesterolemia
Long Description:Pure hypercholesterolemia

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Pure hypercholesterolemia

Non-specific codes like E78.0 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for pure hypercholesterolemia:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use E78.00 for Pure hypercholesterolemia, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use E78.01 for Familial hypercholesterolemia

Information for Patients


Cholesterol

Also called: Hypercholesterolemia, Hyperlipidemia, Hyperlipoproteinemia

What is cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, vitamin D, and substances that help you digest foods. Your body makes all the cholesterol it needs. Cholesterol is also found in foods from animal sources, such as egg yolks, meat, and cheese.

If you have too much cholesterol in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood to form plaque. Plaque sticks to the walls of your arteries. This buildup of plaque is known as atherosclerosis. It can lead to coronary artery disease, where your coronary arteries become narrow or even blocked.

What are HDL, LDL, and VLDL?

HDL, LDL, and VLDL are lipoproteins. They are a combination of fat (lipid) and protein. The lipids need to be attached to the proteins so they can move through the blood. Different types of lipoproteins have different purposes:

What causes high cholesterol?

The most common cause of high cholesterol is an unhealthy lifestyle. This can include

Genetics may also cause people to have high cholesterol. For example, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited form of high cholesterol. Other medical conditions and certain medicines may also cause high cholesterol.

What can raise my risk of high cholesterol?

A variety of things can raise your risk for high cholesterol:

What health problems can high cholesterol cause?

If you have large deposits of plaque in your arteries, an area of plaque can rupture (break open). This can cause a blood clot to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block blood flow in a coronary artery.

If the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your heart muscle is reduced or blocked, it can cause angina (chest pain) or a heart attack.

Plaque also can build up in other arteries in your body, including the arteries that bring oxygen-rich blood to your brain and limbs. This can lead to problems such as carotid artery disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease.

How is high cholesterol diagnosed?

There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high cholesterol. There is a blood test to measure your cholesterol level. When and how often you should get this test depends on your age, risk factors, and family history. The general recommendations are:

For people who are age 19 or younger:

For people who are age 20 or older:

How can I lower my cholesterol?

You can lower your cholesterol through heart-healthy lifestyle changes. They include a heart-healthy eating plan, weight management, and regular physical activity.

If the lifestyle changes alone do not lower your cholesterol enough, you may also need to take medicines. There are several types of cholesterol-lowering drugs available, including statins. If you take medicines to lower your cholesterol, you still should continue with the lifestyle changes.

Some people with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) may receive a treatment called lipoprotein apheresis. This treatment uses a filtering machine to remove LDL cholesterol from the blood. Then the machine returns the rest of the blood back to the person.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Familial hypercholesterolemia Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited condition characterized by very high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is produced in the body and obtained from foods that come from animals (particularly egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products). The body needs this substance to build cell membranes, make certain hormones, and produce compounds that aid in fat digestion. In people with familial hypercholesterolemia, the body is unable to get rid of extra cholesterol, and it builds up in the blood. Too much cholesterol increases a person's risk of developing heart disease.People with familial hypercholesterolemia have a high risk of developing a form of heart disease called coronary artery disease at a young age. This condition occurs when excess cholesterol in the bloodstream is deposited on the inner walls of blood vessels, particularly the arteries that supply blood to the heart (coronary arteries). The abnormal buildup of cholesterol forms clumps (plaques) that narrow and harden artery walls. As the plaques get bigger, they can clog the arteries and restrict the flow of blood to the heart. The buildup of plaques in coronary arteries causes a form of chest pain called angina and greatly increases a person's risk of having a heart attack.Familial hypercholesterolemia can also cause health problems related to the buildup of excess cholesterol in tissues other than the heart and blood vessels. If cholesterol accumulates in the tissues that attach muscles to bones (tendons), it causes characteristic growths called tendon xanthomas. These growths most often affect the Achilles tendons, which attach the calf muscles to the heels, and tendons in the hands and fingers. Yellowish cholesterol deposits can develop under the skin of the eyelids and are known as xanthelasmata. Cholesterol can also accumulate at the edges of the clear, front surface of the eye (the cornea), leading to a gray-colored ring called an arcus cornealis.
[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)