ICD-10-CM Code E32.1

Abscess of thymus

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E32.1 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of abscess of thymus. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E32.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like abscess of thymus.

ICD-10:E32.1
Short Description:Abscess of thymus
Long Description:Abscess of thymus

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E32.1 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Abscess of thymus

Convert E32.1 to ICD-9

  • 254.1 - Abscess of thymus

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of other endocrine glands (E20-E35)
      • Diseases of thymus (E32)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Abscess

An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Abscess scan - radioactive (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Amebic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anorectal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Brain abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Epidural abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intra-abdominal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pancreatic abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peritonsillar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pilonidal cyst resection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pyogenic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Retropharyngeal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Skin abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subareolar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tooth abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Lymphatic Diseases

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of

  • Lymph - a fluid that contains white blood cells that defend against germs
  • Lymph vessels - vessels that carry lymph throughout your body. They are different from blood vessels.
  • Lymph nodes - glands found throughout the lymph vessels. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where white blood cells fight infection.

Your bone marrow and thymus produce the cells in lymph. They are part of the system, too.

The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. If it's not working properly, fluid builds in your tissues and causes swelling, called lymphedema. Other lymphatic system problems can include infections, blockage, and cancer.

  • Cancer and lymph nodes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cystic hygroma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Groin lump (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymph node biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymph system (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymphadenitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymphangitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymphofollicular hyperplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neck lump (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Swollen lymph nodes (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]