2022 ICD-10-CM Code E31.0

Autoimmune polyglandular failure

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:E31.0
Short Description:Autoimmune polyglandular failure
Long Description:Autoimmune polyglandular failure

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of other endocrine glands (E20-E35)
      • Polyglandular dysfunction (E31)

E31.0 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular failure. The code E31.0 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code E31.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like a. schmidt's syndrome, addison's disease, autoimmune enteropathy, autoimmune enteropathy and endocrinopathy with susceptibility to chronic infection syndrome, autoimmune hypoparathyroidism , autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 3, etc.

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E31.0:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E31.0 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert E31.0 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code E31.0 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Autoimmune Diseases

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body.

No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African American, Hispanic American, and Native American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases.

There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling.

The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.


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Endocrine Diseases

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include

If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels.

In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.


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Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an inherited condition that affects many of the body's organs. It is one of many autoimmune diseases, which are disorders that occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs by mistake.

In most cases, the signs and symptoms of APECED begin in childhood or adolescence. This condition commonly involves three characteristic features: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC), hypoparathyroidism, and adrenal gland insufficiency. Affected individuals typically have at least two of these features, and many have all three.

CMC is a tendency to develop infections of the skin, the nails, and the moist lining of body cavities (mucous membranes) caused by a type of fungus called Candida. These infections, which are commonly known as yeast infections, are chronic, which means they recur and can last a long time. CMC is usually the first of the three characteristic features of APECED to become apparent in people with this disorder. Almost all affected individuals develop infections of the oral cavity (known as thrush). Infections of the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach (the esophagus) are also common, while the skin and nails are affected less often. In women, vaginal infections frequently occur.

Other features of APECED result from the body's immune system attacking the network of hormone-producing glands (the endocrine system). The second characteristic feature of the disorder is hypoparathyroidism, which is a malfunction of the parathyroid glands. These glands secrete a hormone that regulates the body's use of calcium and phosphorus. Damage to the parathyroid glands leads to reduced parathyroid hormone production (hypoparathyroidism). Hypoparathyroidism can cause a tingling sensation in the lips, fingers, and toes; muscle pain and cramping; weakness; and fatigue. Serious effects of hypoparathyroidism, such spasms of the voicebox (larynx) leading to breathing problems and seizures, can be life-threatening.

Damage to the small hormone-producing glands on top of each kidney (adrenal glands) results in a third major feature of APECED, adrenal gland insufficiency (autoimmune Addison disease). Reduced hormone production by the adrenal glands leads to signs and symptoms that can include fatigue, muscle weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, low blood pressure, and changes in skin coloring. Other endocrine problems that can occur in APECED include type 1 diabetes resulting from impaired production of the hormone insulin; a shortage of growth hormone leading to short stature; problems affecting the internal reproductive organs (ovaries or testes) that can cause inability to conceive children (infertility); and dysfunction of the thyroid gland (a butterfly-shaped tissue in the lower neck), which can result in many symptoms including weight gain and fatigue.

Autoimmune problems affecting non-endocrine tissues can lead to a variety of additional signs and symptoms in people with APECED. These features occur more often in North American populations than in European populations. Rashes that resemble hives (urticarial eruptions) are common and often occur in infancy and early childhood. Other early signs and symptoms may include thin enamel on the teeth (enamel hypoplasia) and chronic diarrhea or constipation associated with difficulty in absorbing nutrients from food. Additional features that occur in people with APECED, many of which can lead to permanent organ and tissue damage if left untreated, include stomach irritation (gastritis), liver inflammation (hepatitis), lung irritation (pneumonitis), dry mouth and dry eyes (Sjogren-like syndrome), inflammation of the eyes (keratitis), kidney problems (nephritis), vitamin B12 deficiency, hair loss (alopecia), loss of skin color in blotches (vitiligo), high blood pressure (hypertension), or a small (atrophic) or absent spleen (asplenia).


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)