ICD-10-CM Code E22.0

Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E22.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of acromegaly and pituitary gigantism. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E22.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acromegalic facies, acromegalic feet, acromegaly, arthropathy associated with acromegaly, cerebral gigantism jaw cysts syndrome, eunuchoid gigantism, etc

ICD-10:E22.0
Short Description:Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism
Long Description:Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E22.0:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Overproduction of growth hormone

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • constitutional gigantism E34.4
  • constitutional tall stature E34.4
  • increased secretion from endocrine pancreas of growth hormone-releasing hormone E16.8

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E22.0 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acromegalic facies
  • Acromegalic feet
  • Acromegaly
  • Arthropathy associated with acromegaly
  • Cerebral gigantism jaw cysts syndrome
  • Eunuchoid gigantism
  • Familial infantile gigantism
  • Gigantism
  • Gigantism and acromegaly
  • Gigantism due to somatostatin deficiency
  • Hyperactive behavior
  • Hypermelanosis due to acromegaly
  • Hypermelanosis due to endocrine disorder
  • Hypersomatotropic gigantism
  • Large, broad feet
  • Myopathy in acromegaly
  • Neuropathy in acromegaly
  • Overproduction of growth hormone
  • Sotos' syndrome
  • X-linked acrogigantism
  • X-linked intellectual disability with acromegaly and hyperactivity syndrome

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code E22.0 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 643 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 644 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 645 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert E22.0 to ICD-9

  • 253.0 - Acromegaly and gigantism (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of other endocrine glands (E20-E35)
      • Hyperfunction of pituitary gland (E22)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Pituitary Disorders

Your pituitary gland is a pea-sized gland at the base of your brain. The pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body.

With pituitary disorders, you often have too much or too little of one of your hormones. Injuries can cause pituitary disorders, but the most common cause is a pituitary tumor.


[Learn More]

Sotos syndrome Sotos syndrome is a disorder characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, overgrowth in childhood, and learning disabilities or delayed development of mental and movement abilities. Characteristic facial features include a long, narrow face; a high forehead; flushed (reddened) cheeks; and a small, pointed chin. In addition, the outside corners of the eyes may point downward (down-slanting palpebral fissures). This facial appearance is most notable in early childhood. Affected infants and children tend to grow quickly; they are significantly taller than their siblings and peers and have an unusually large head. However, adult height is usually in the normal range.People with Sotos syndrome often have intellectual disability, and most also have behavioral problems. Frequent behavioral issues include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), phobias, obsessions and compulsions, tantrums, and impulsive behaviors. Problems with speech and language are also common. Affected individuals often have a stutter, a monotone voice, and problems with sound production. Additionally, weak muscle tone (hypotonia) may delay other aspects of early development, particularly motor skills such as sitting and crawling.Other signs and symptoms of Sotos syndrome can include an abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), seizures, heart or kidney defects, hearing loss, and problems with vision. Some infants with this disorder experience yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice) and poor feeding.A small percentage of people with Sotos syndrome have developed cancer, most often in childhood, but no single form of cancer occurs most frequently with this condition. It remains uncertain whether Sotos syndrome increases the risk of specific types of cancer. If people with this disorder have an increased cancer risk, it is only slightly greater than that of the general population.
[Learn More]