ICD-10-CM Code E16.0

Drug-induced hypoglycemia without coma

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E16.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of drug-induced hypoglycemia without coma. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E16.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like alcohol-induced hypoglycemia, drug-induced hyperinsulinemia, drug-induced hypoglycemia, drug-induced hypoglycemia without coma, non-diabetic hypoglycemia, non-diabetic hypoglycemia, etc

ICD-10:E16.0
Short Description:Drug-induced hypoglycemia without coma
Long Description:Drug-induced hypoglycemia without coma

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E16.0:

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code for adverse effect, if applicable, to identify drug T36 T50

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • diabetes with hypoglycemia without coma E09.649

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E16.0 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Alcohol-induced hypoglycemia
  • Drug-induced hyperinsulinemia
  • Drug-induced hypoglycemia
  • Drug-induced hypoglycemia without coma
  • Non-diabetic hypoglycemia
  • Non-diabetic hypoglycemia

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code E16.0 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 643 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 644 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 645 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert E16.0 to ICD-9

  • 251.1 - Oth spcf hypoglycemia (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Other disorders of glucose regulation and pancreatic internal secretion (E15-E16)
      • Other disorders of pancreatic internal secretion (E16)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Hypoglycemia

Also called: Low blood sugar

Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose.

In most people, this raises blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. Signs include

  • Hunger
  • Shakiness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Feeling anxious or weak

In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia is often a side effect of diabetes medicines. Eating or drinking something with carbohydrates can help. If it happens often, your health care provider may need to change your treatment plan.

You can also have low blood sugar without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Drug-induced hypoglycemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Insulin C-peptide (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Low blood sugar (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Low blood sugar - newborns (Medical Encyclopedia)

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