ICD-10 Code E13.9

Other specified diabetes mellitus without complications

Version 2019 Billable Code Questionable Admission Codes
ICD-10:E13.9
Short Description:Other specified diabetes mellitus without complications
Long Description:Other specified diabetes mellitus without complications

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 E13.9 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other specified diabetes mellitus without complications. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13)
      • Other specified diabetes mellitus (E13)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Questionable admission codes - Some diagnoses are not usually sufficient justification for admission to an acute care hospital. For example, if a patient is given code R030 for elevated blood pressure reading, without diagnosis of hypertension, then the patient would have a questionable admission, since elevated blood pressure reading is not normally sufficient justification for admission to a hospital.

Convert E13.9 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 249.00 - Sec DM wo cmp nt st uncn (Approximate Flag)
  • 250.00 - DMII wo cmp nt st uncntr (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Acquired partial lipodystrophy
  • Acrorenal field defect, ectodermal dysplasia, and lipoatrophic diabetes
  • Agenesis of cerebellum
  • Atypical diabetes mellitus
  • Congenital hypoplasia of pancreas
  • Diabetes mellitus associated with genetic syndrome
  • Diabetes mellitus associated with hormonal etiology
  • Diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic disease
  • Diabetes mellitus associated with receptor abnormality
  • Diabetes mellitus due to genetic defect in beta cell function
  • Diabetes mellitus due to genetic defect in insulin action
  • Diabetes mellitus due to insulin receptor antibodies
  • Diabetes mellitus due to structurally abnormal insulin
  • Houssay's syndrome
  • Hyperproinsulinemia
  • Intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism, hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus syndrome
  • Lipodystrophy, partial, with Rieger anomaly, short stature, and insulinopenic diabetes mellitus
  • Maturity onset diabetes of the young, type 1
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 10
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 11
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 3
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 4
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 5
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 6
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 7
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 8
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 9
  • Muscular atrophy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetes mellitus
  • Neonatal diabetes mellitus
  • Pancreatic hypoplasia, diabetes mellitus, congenital heart disease syndrome
  • Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus
  • Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus with cerebellar agenesis syndrome
  • Secondary diabetes mellitus
  • Secondary endocrine diabetes mellitus

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E13.9 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Diabetes

Also called: DM, Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes.

Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • A1C test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Blood sugar test - blood (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes - keeping active (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • High blood sugar (Medical Encyclopedia)

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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.