2021 ICD-10-CM Code E10.3559

Type 1 diabetes mellitus with stable proliferative diabetic retinopathy, unspecified eye

Version 2021
Billable Code
7th Character Code
Unspecified Code

Valid for Submission

E10.3559 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus with stable proliferative diabetic retinopathy, unspecified eye. The code E10.3559 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like E10.3559 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

ICD-10:E10.3559
Short Description:Type 1 diabetes with stable prolif diabetic rtnop, unsp
Long Description:Type 1 diabetes mellitus with stable proliferative diabetic retinopathy, unspecified eye

Code Classification

Replacement Code

E103559 replaces the following previously assigned ICD-10 code(s):

Convert E10.3559 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


Diabetes Type 1

Also called: Insulin-dependent diabetes, Juvenile diabetes, Type I diabetes

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age. Symptoms may include

A blood test can show if you have diabetes. If you do, you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life. A blood test called the A1C can check to see how well you are managing your diabetes.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Diabetic Eye Problems

Also called: Diabetic retinopathy

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness in American adults.

Your retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your retina.

You may not notice it at first. Symptoms can include

Treatment often includes laser treatment or surgery, with follow-up care.

Two other eye problems can happen to people with diabetes. A cataract is a cloud over the lens of your eye. Surgery helps you see clearly again. Glaucoma happens when pressure builds up in the eye, damaging the main nerve. Eye drops or surgery can help.

If you have diabetes, you should have a complete eye exam every year. Finding and treating problems early may save your vision.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018