2022 ICD-10-CM Code E07.1

Dyshormogenetic goiter

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:E07.1
Short Description:Dyshormogenetic goiter
Long Description:Dyshormogenetic goiter

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of thyroid gland (E00-E07)
      • Other disorders of thyroid (E07)

E07.1 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of dyshormogenetic goiter. The code E07.1 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code E07.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like dyshormonogenetic goiter and iodide leak, dyshormonogenic goiter, familial dyshormonogenetic goiter, hypothyroidism due to defect in thyroid hormone synthesis, hypothyroidism due to iodide organification defect , hypothyroidism due to iodide trapping defect, etc.

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E07.1:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E07.1 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert E07.1 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


Thyroid Diseases

Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. It is one of your endocrine glands, which make hormones. Thyroid hormones control the rate of many activities in your body. These include how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. All of these activities are your body's metabolism.

Thyroid problems include

To diagnose thyroid diseases, doctors use a medical history, physical exam, and thyroid tests. They sometimes also use a biopsy. Treatment depends on the problem, but may include medicines, radioiodine therapy, or thyroid surgery.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Pendred syndrome

Pendred syndrome is a disorder typically associated with hearing loss and a thyroid condition called a goiter. A goiter is an enlargement of the thyroid gland, which is a butterfly-shaped organ at the base of the neck that produces hormones. If a goiter develops in a person with Pendred syndrome, it usually forms between late childhood and early adulthood. In most cases, this enlargement does not cause the thyroid to malfunction.

In most people with Pendred syndrome, severe to profound hearing loss caused by changes in the inner ear (sensorineural hearing loss) is evident at birth. Less commonly, hearing loss does not develop until later in infancy or early childhood. Some affected individuals also have problems with balance caused by dysfunction of the vestibular system, which is the part of the inner ear that helps maintain the body's balance and orientation.

An inner ear abnormality called an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is a characteristic feature of Pendred syndrome. The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal that connects the inner ear with the inside of the skull. Some affected individuals also have an abnormally shaped cochlea, which is a snail-shaped structure in the inner ear that helps process sound. The combination of an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and an abnormally shaped cochlea is known as Mondini malformation.

Pendred syndrome shares features with other hearing loss and thyroid conditions, and it is unclear whether they are best considered as separate disorders or as a spectrum of related signs and symptoms. These conditions include a form of nonsyndromic hearing loss (hearing loss that does not affect other parts of the body) called DFNB4, and, in a small number of people, a form of congenital hypothyroidism resulting from an abnormally small thyroid gland (thyroid hypoplasia). All of these conditions are caused by mutations in the same gene.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)