ICD-10-CM Code E06.3

Autoimmune thyroiditis

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E06.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E06.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acquired ataxia, autoimmune hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis, chronic thyroiditis, fibrous autoimmune thyroiditis, hashimoto thyroiditis, etc

ICD-10:E06.3
Short Description:Autoimmune thyroiditis
Long Description:Autoimmune thyroiditis

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E06.3:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis
  • Hashitoxicosis (transient)
  • Lymphadenoid goiter
  • Lymphocytic thyroiditis
  • Struma lymphomatosa

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E06.3 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acquired ataxia
  • Autoimmune hypothyroidism
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Chronic thyroiditis
  • Fibrous autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Hashimoto thyroiditis
  • Hashitoxicosis - transient
  • Hyperthyroidism with Hashimoto disease
  • Hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis
  • Restrictive ophthalmopathy
  • Steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Subacute autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Subacute thyroiditis
  • Thyroid eye disease

Clinical Information

  • THYROIDITIS AUTOIMMUNE-. inflammatory disease of the thyroid gland due to autoimmune responses leading to lymphocytic infiltration of the gland. it is characterized by the presence of circulating thyroid antigen specific t cells and thyroid autoantibodies. the clinical signs can range from hypothyroidism to thyrotoxicosis depending on the type of autoimmune thyroiditis.

Convert E06.3 to ICD-9

  • 245.2 - Chr lymphocyt thyroidit

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of thyroid gland (E00-E07)
      • Thyroiditis (E06)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Thyroid Diseases

Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. It is one of your endocrine glands, which make hormones. Thyroid hormones control the rate of many activities in your body. These include how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. All of these activities are your body's metabolism.

Thyroid problems include

  • Goiter - enlargement of the thyroid gland
  • Hyperthyroidism - when your thyroid gland makes more thyroid hormones than your body needs
  • Hypothyroidism - when your thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormones
  • Thyroid cancer
  • Thyroid nodules - lumps in the thyroid gland
  • Thyroiditis - swelling of the thyroid

To diagnose thyroid diseases, doctors use a medical history, physical exam, and thyroid tests. They sometimes also use a biopsy. Treatment depends on the problem, but may include medicines, radioiodine therapy, or thyroid surgery.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • Antithyroglobulin antibody (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Antithyroid microsomal antibody (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Goiter (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radioactive iodine uptake (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Silent thyroiditis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subacute thyroiditis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • T3 test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • T4 test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Thyroid gland removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Thyroid nodule (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Thyroid storm (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Thyroid Tests - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • TSH test (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Hashimoto thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis is a condition that affects the function of the thyroid, which is a butterfly-shaped gland in the lower neck. The thyroid makes hormones that help regulate a wide variety of critical body functions. For example, thyroid hormones influence growth and development, body temperature, heart rate, menstrual cycles, and weight. Hashimoto thyroiditis is a form of chronic inflammation that can damage the thyroid, reducing its ability to produce hormones.One of the first signs of Hashimoto thyroiditis is an enlargement of the thyroid called a goiter. Depending on its size, the enlarged thyroid can cause the neck to look swollen and may interfere with breathing and swallowing. As damage to the thyroid continues, the gland can shrink over a period of years and the goiter may eventually disappear.Other signs and symptoms resulting from an underactive thyroid can include excessive tiredness (fatigue), weight gain or difficulty losing weight, hair that is thin and dry, a slow heart rate, joint or muscle pain, and constipation. People with this condition may also have a pale, puffy face and feel cold even when others around them are warm. Affected women can have heavy or irregular menstrual periods and difficulty conceiving a child (impaired fertility). Difficulty concentrating and depression can also be signs of a shortage of thyroid hormones.Hashimoto thyroiditis usually appears in mid-adulthood, although it can occur earlier or later in life. Its signs and symptoms tend to develop gradually over months or years.
[Learn More]