ICD-10 Code D82.4

Hyperimmunoglobulin E [IgE] syndrome

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

D82.4 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hyperimmunoglobulin e [ige] syndrome. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10 code D82.4 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like chemotactic disorder or congenital hypergammaglobulinemia or hyperimmunoglobulin e syndrome.

ICD-10:D82.4
Short Description:Hyperimmunoglobulin E [IgE] syndrome
Long Description:Hyperimmunoglobulin E [IgE] syndrome

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D82.4 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Chemotactic disorder
  • Congenital hypergammaglobulinemia
  • Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code D82.4 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 814 - RETICULOENDOTHELIAL AND IMMUNITY DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 815 - RETICULOENDOTHELIAL AND IMMUNITY DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 816 - RETICULOENDOTHELIAL AND IMMUNITY DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert D82.4 to ICD-9

  • 279.8 - Immune mechanism dis NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D80-D89)
      • Immunodeficiency associated with other major defects (D82)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Immune System and Disorders

Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps your body to recognize these "foreign" invaders. Then its job is to keep them out, or if it can't, to find and destroy them.

If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be serious. Disorders of the immune system include

  • Allergy and asthma - immune responses to substances that are usually not harmful
  • Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts
  • Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your own body's cells and tissues by mistake

[Learn More]

Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES), formerly known as Job syndrome, is a condition that affects several body systems, particularly the immune system. Recurrent infections are common in people with this condition. Affected individuals tend to have frequent bouts of pneumonia, which are caused by certain kinds of bacteria that infect the lungs and cause inflammation. Inflammation is a normal immune system response to injury and foreign invaders (such as bacteria). However, excessive inflammation can damage body tissues. Recurring pneumonia often results in the formation of air-filled cysts (pneumatoceles) in the lungs. Frequent skin infections and an inflammatory skin disorder called eczema are also very common in AD-HIES. These skin problems cause rashes, blisters, accumulations of pus (abscesses), open sores, and scaling.For unknown reasons, people with AD-HIES have abnormally high levels of an immune system protein called immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the blood. IgE normally triggers an immune response against foreign invaders in the body, particularly parasitic worms, and is involved in allergies. However, IgE is not needed for these roles in people with AD-HIES, and it is unclear why affected individuals have such high levels of the protein without having allergies.AD-HIES also affects other parts of the body, including the bones and teeth. Many people with AD-HIES have skeletal abnormalities such as an unusually large range of joint movement (hyperextensibility), an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis), reduced bone density (osteopenia), and a tendency for bones to fracture easily. A common dental abnormality in this condition is that the primary (baby) teeth do not fall out at the usual time during childhood but are retained as the adult teeth grow in. Other signs and symptoms of AD-HIES can include abnormalities of the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle (coronary arteries), distinctive facial features, and structural abnormalities of the brain, which do not affect a person's intelligence.
[Learn More]

DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is a disorder of the immune system. The condition is characterized by recurrent infections that are severe and can be life-threatening. The infections can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. Skin infections cause rashes, blisters, accumulations of pus (abscesses), open sores, and scaling. People with DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome also tend to have frequent bouts of pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. Other immune system-related problems in people with DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome include an inflammatory skin disorder called eczema, food or environmental allergies, and asthma.DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by abnormally high levels of an immune system protein called immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the blood; the levels can be more than 10 times higher than normal for no known reason. IgE normally triggers an immune response against foreign invaders in the body, particularly parasitic worms, and plays a role in allergies. It is unclear why people with DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome have such high levels of this protein. People with DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome also have highly elevated numbers of certain white blood cells called eosinophils (hypereosinophilia). Eosinophils aid in the immune response and are involved in allergic reactions.Some people with DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome have neurological problems, such as paralysis that affects the face or one side of the body (hemiplegia). Blockage of blood flow in the brain or abnormal bleeding in the brain, both of which can lead to stroke, can also occur in DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome.People with DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome have a greater-than-average risk of developing cancer, particularly cancers of the blood or skin.DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is also commonly called autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome. However, researchers have identified several conditions that feature elevated levels of IgE and that follow an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Each of these conditions has its own set of additional signs and symptoms and a different genetic cause. Some doctors consider these conditions forms of hyper-IgE syndrome, while others consider them independent disorders.
[Learn More]