2021 ICD-10-CM Code D82.0

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

Version 2021
Billable Code
MS-DRG Mapping

Valid for Submission

D82.0 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of wiskott-aldrich syndrome. The code D82.0 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code D82.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like dense body defect, immunodeficiency associated with multiple organ system abnormalities, immunodeficiency with major anomalies, wiskott-aldrich autosomal dominant variant syndrome or wiskott-aldrich syndrome.

ICD-10:D82.0
Short Description:Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
Long Description:Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

Code Classification

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D82.0:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D82.0 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert D82.0 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


Immune System and Disorders

Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps your body to recognize these "foreign" invaders. Then its job is to keep them out, or if it can't, to find and destroy them.

If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be serious. Disorders of the immune system include

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


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Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is characterized by abnormal immune system function (immune deficiency), eczema (an inflammatory skin disorder characterized by abnormal patches of red, irritated skin), and a reduced ability to form blood clots. This condition primarily affects males.Individuals with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have microthrombocytopenia, which is a decrease in the number and size of blood cells involved in clotting (platelets). This platelet abnormality, which is typically present from birth, can lead to easy bruising, bloody diarrhea, or episodes of prolonged bleeding following nose bleeds or minor trauma. Microthrombocytopenia can also lead to small areas of bleeding just under the surface of the skin, resulting in purplish spots called purpura, or variably sized rashes made up of tiny red spots called petechiae. In some cases, particularly if a bleeding episode occurs within the brain, prolonged bleeding can be life-threatening.Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is also characterized by abnormal or nonfunctional immune system cells known as white blood cells. Changes in white blood cells lead to an increased risk of several immune and inflammatory disorders in people with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. These immune problems vary in severity and include an increased susceptibility to infection from bacteria, viruses, and fungi. People with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome are at greater risk of developing autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, or hemolytic anemia. These disorder occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs. The chance of developing certain types of cancer, such as cancer of the immune system cells (lymphoma), is also increased in people with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is often considered to be part of a disease spectrum with two other disorders: X-linked thrombocytopenia and severe congenital neutropenia. These conditions have overlapping signs and symptoms and the same genetic cause.
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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)