2021 ICD-10-CM Code D72.0

Genetic anomalies of leukocytes

Version 2021
Billable Code
MS-DRG Mapping

Valid for Submission

D72.0 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of genetic anomalies of leukocytes. The code D72.0 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code D72.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like alders syndrome, combined phagocytic defect, congenital leukocyte adherence deficiency, congenital leukocyte adherence deficiency, congenital leukocyte adherence deficiency , de vaal's syndrome, etc.

ICD-10:D72.0
Short Description:Genetic anomalies of leukocytes
Long Description:Genetic anomalies of leukocytes

Code Classification

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D72.0:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D72.0 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert D72.0 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


Blood Disorders

Also called: Hematologic diseases

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.

Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet.

Types of blood disorders include


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Genetic Disorders

Genes are the building blocks of heredity. They are passed from parent to child. They hold DNA, the instructions for making proteins. Proteins do most of the work in cells. They move molecules from one place to another, build structures, break down toxins, and do many other maintenance jobs.

Sometimes there is a mutation, a change in a gene or genes. The mutation changes the gene's instructions for making a protein, so the protein does not work properly or is missing entirely. This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder.

You can inherit a gene mutation from one or both parents. A mutation can also happen during your lifetime.

There are three types of genetic disorders:

Genetic tests on blood and other tissue can identify genetic disorders.

NIH: National Library of Medicine


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

MYH9-related disorder MYH9-related disorder is a condition that can have many signs and symptoms, including bleeding problems, hearing loss, kidney (renal) disease, and clouding of the lens of the eyes (cataracts).The bleeding problems in people with MYH9-related disorder are due to thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia is a reduced level of circulating platelets, which are small cells that normally assist with blood clotting. People with MYH9-related disorder typically experience easy bruising, and affected women have excessive bleeding during menstruation (menorrhagia). The platelets in people with MYH9-related disorder are larger than normal. These enlarged platelets have difficulty moving into tiny blood vessels like capillaries. As a result, the platelet level is even lower in these small vessels, further impairing clotting.Some people with MYH9-related disorder develop hearing loss caused by abnormalities of the inner ear (sensorineural hearing loss). Hearing loss may be present from birth or can develop anytime into late adulthood.An estimated 30 to 70 percent of people with MYH9-related disorder develop renal disease, usually beginning in early adulthood. The first sign of renal disease in MYH9-related disorder is typically protein or blood in the urine. Renal disease in these individuals particularly affects structures called glomeruli, which are clusters of tiny blood vessels that help filter waste products from the blood. The resulting damage to the kidneys can lead to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD).Some affected individuals develop cataracts in early adulthood that worsen over time.Not everyone with MYH9-related disorder has all of the major features. All individuals with MYH9-related disorder have thrombocytopenia and enlarged platelets. Most commonly, affected individuals will also have hearing loss and renal disease. Cataracts are the least common sign of this disorder.MYH9-related disorder was previously thought to be four separate disorders: May-Hegglin anomaly, Epstein syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, and Sebastian syndrome. All of these disorders involved thrombocytopenia and enlarged platelets and were distinguished by some combination of hearing loss, renal disease, and cataracts. When it was discovered that these four conditions all had the same genetic cause, they were combined and renamed MYH9-related disorder.
[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)