D70.0 - Congenital agranulocytosis

Version 2023
ICD-10:D70.0
Short Description:Congenital agranulocytosis
Long Description:Congenital agranulocytosis
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Other disorders of blood and blood-forming organs (D70-D77)
      • Neutropenia (D70)

D70.0 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of congenital agranulocytosis. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to this diagnosis code:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
D70.0288.01 - Congenital neutropenia

Patient Education


Blood Disorders

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.

Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet.

Types of blood disorders include:


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Severe congenital neutropenia

Severe congenital neutropenia is a condition that increases the risk of repeated infections in affected individuals. People with this condition have an abnormally low level (deficiency) of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that plays a role in inflammation and in fighting infection. The shortage of neutrophils, called neutropenia, is apparent at birth or soon afterward. It leads to frequent infections beginning in infancy, including infections of the sinuses, lungs, and liver. Affected individuals can also develop fevers and inflammation of the gums (gingivitis) and skin. Approximately 40 percent of affected people have decreased bone density (osteopenia) and may develop osteoporosis, a condition that makes bones progressively more brittle and likely to fracture. In people with severe congenital neutropenia, bone disorders can begin at any time from infancy through adulthood.

Approximately 20 percent of people with severe congenital neutropenia develop certain cancerous conditions of the blood, particularly myelodysplastic syndrome or leukemia during adolescence.

Some people with severe congenital neutropenia have additional health problems such as seizures, developmental delay, or heart and genital abnormalities.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History