2022 ICD-10-CM Code D68.61

Antiphospholipid syndrome

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:D68.61
Short Description:Antiphospholipid syndrome
Long Description:Antiphospholipid syndrome

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Coagulation defects, purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D65-D69)
      • Other coagulation defects (D68)

D68.61 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. The code D68.61 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code D68.61 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acquired thrombophilia, antiphospholipid syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome in pregnancy, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome , neonatal antiphospholipid syndrome, etc.

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D68.61:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D68.61 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert D68.61 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code D68.61 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Bleeding Disorders

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood to clot, your body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or clotting factors or they don't work the way they should.

Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such as severe liver disease or a lack of vitamin K. They can also be inherited. Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder. Bleeding disorders can also be a side effect of medicines such as blood thinners.

Various blood tests can check for a bleeding disorder. You will also have a physical exam and history. Treatments depend on the cause. They may include medicines and transfusions of blood, platelets, or clotting factor.


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Blood Clots

What is a blood clot?

A blood clot is mass of blood that forms when platelets, proteins, and cells in the blood stick together. When you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. After the bleeding stops and healing takes place, your body usually breaks down and removes the blood clot. But sometimes the blood clots form where they shouldn't, your body makes too many blood clots or abnormal blood clots, or the blood clots don't break down like they should. These blood clots can be dangerous and may cause other health problems.

Blood clots can form in, or travel to, the blood vessels in the limbs, lungs, brain, heart, and kidneys. The types of problems blood clots can cause will depend on where they are:

Who is at risk for blood clots?

Certain factors can raise the risk of blood clots:

What are the symptoms of blood clots?

The symptoms for blood clots can be different, depending on where the blood clot is:

How are blood clots diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to diagnose blood clots:

What are the treatments for blood clots?

Treatments for blood clots depend on where the blood clot is located and how severe it is. Treatments may include

Can blood clots be prevented?

You may be able to help prevent blood clots by

Some people at high risk may need to take blood thinners to prevent blood clots.


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Antiphospholipid syndrome

Antiphospholipid syndrome is a disorder characterized by an increased tendency to form abnormal blood clots (thromboses) that can block blood vessels. This clotting tendency is known as thrombophilia. In antiphospholipid syndrome, the thromboses can develop in nearly any blood vessel in the body, but most frequently occur in the vessels of the lower limbs. If a blood clot forms in the vessels in the brain, blood flow is impaired and can lead to stroke. Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs.

Women with antiphospholipid syndrome are at increased risk of complications during pregnancy. These complications include pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia), an underdeveloped placenta (placental insufficiency), early delivery, or pregnancy loss (miscarriage). In addition, women with antiphospholipid syndrome are at greater risk of having a thrombosis during pregnancy than at other times during their lives. At birth, infants of mothers with antiphospholipid syndrome may be small and underweight.

A thrombosis or pregnancy complication is typically the first sign of antiphospholipid syndrome. This condition usually appears in early to mid-adulthood but can begin at any age.

Other signs and symptoms of antiphospholipid syndrome that affect blood cells and vessels include a reduced amount of cells involved in blood clotting called platelets (thrombocytopenia), a shortage of red blood cells (anemia) due to their premature breakdown (hemolysis), and a purplish skin discoloration (livedo reticularis) caused by abnormalities in the tiny blood vessels of the skin. In addition, affected individuals may have open sores (ulcers) on the skin, migraine headaches, heart disease, or intellectual disability. Many people with antiphospholipid syndrome also have other autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus.

Rarely, people with antiphospholipid syndrome develop thromboses in multiple blood vessels throughout their body. These thromboses block blood flow in affected organs, which impairs their function and ultimately causes organ failure. These individuals are said to have catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). CAPS typically affects the kidneys, lungs, brain, heart, and liver, and is fatal in over half of affected individuals. Less than 1 percent of individuals with antiphospholipid syndrome develop CAPS.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)