ICD-10-CM Code D68.51

Activated protein C resistance

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

D68.51 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of activated protein c resistance. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D68.51 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like factor v leiden mutation or heterozygous factor v leiden mutation or homozygous factor v leiden mutation or resistance to activated protein c due to factor v leiden or thrombophilia due to drug therapy.

ICD-10:D68.51
Short Description:Activated protein C resistance
Long Description:Activated protein C resistance

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D68.51:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Factor V Leiden mutation

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D68.51 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Factor V Leiden mutation
  • Heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation
  • Homozygous Factor V Leiden mutation
  • Resistance to activated protein C due to Factor V Leiden
  • Thrombophilia due to drug therapy

Clinical Information

  • ACTIVATED PROTEIN C RESISTANCE-. a hemostatic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein c apc. the activated form of factor v factor va is more slowly degraded by activated protein c. factor v leiden mutation r506q is the most common cause of apc resistance.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code D68.51 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 814 - RETICULOENDOTHELIAL AND IMMUNITY DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 815 - RETICULOENDOTHELIAL AND IMMUNITY DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 816 - RETICULOENDOTHELIAL AND IMMUNITY DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert D68.51 to ICD-9

  • 289.81 - Prim hypercoagulable st (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Coagulation defects, purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D65-D69)
      • Other coagulation defects (D68)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Bleeding Disorders

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood to clot, your body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or clotting factors or they don't work the way they should.

Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such as severe liver disease or a lack of vitamin K. They can also be inherited. Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder. Bleeding disorders can also be a side effect of medicines such as blood thinners.

Various blood tests can check for a bleeding disorder. You will also have a physical exam and history. Treatments depend on the cause. They may include medicines and transfusions of blood, platelets, or clotting factor.


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Factor V Leiden thrombophilia Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is an inherited disorder of blood clotting. Factor V Leiden is the name of a specific gene mutation that results in thrombophilia, which is an increased tendency to form abnormal blood clots that can block blood vessels.People with factor V Leiden thrombophilia have a higher than average risk of developing a type of blood clot called a deep venous thrombosis (DVT). DVTs occur most often in the legs, although they can also occur in other parts of the body, including the brain, eyes, liver, and kidneys. Factor V Leiden thrombophilia also increases the risk that clots will break away from their original site and travel through the bloodstream. These clots can lodge in the lungs, where they are known as pulmonary emboli. Although factor V Leiden thrombophilia increases the risk of blood clots, only about 10 percent of individuals with the factor V Leiden mutation ever develop abnormal clots.The factor V Leiden mutation is associated with a slightly increased risk of pregnancy loss (miscarriage). Women with this mutation are two to three times more likely to have multiple (recurrent) miscarriages or a pregnancy loss during the second or third trimester. Some research suggests that the factor V Leiden mutation may also increase the risk of other complications during pregnancy, including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia), slow fetal growth, and early separation of the placenta from the uterine wall (placental abruption). However, the association between the factor V Leiden mutation and these complications has not been confirmed. Most women with factor V Leiden thrombophilia have normal pregnancies.
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