ICD-10-CM Code D61.01

Constitutional (pure) red blood cell aplasia

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

D61.01 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of constitutional (pure) red blood cell aplasia. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D61.01 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute pure red cell aplasia, bone marrow erythropoiesis - finding, constitutional aplastic anemia, constitutional red cell aplasia and hypoplasia, constitutional red cell hypoplasia, diamond-blackfan anemia, etc

ICD-10:D61.01
Short Description:Constitutional (pure) red blood cell aplasia
Long Description:Constitutional (pure) red blood cell aplasia

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D61.01:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Blackfan-Diamond syndrome
  • Congenital (pure) red cell aplasia
  • Familial hypoplastic anemia
  • Primary (pure) red cell aplasia
  • Red cell (pure) aplasia of infants

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • acquired red cell aplasia D60.9

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D61.01 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acute pure red cell aplasia
  • Bone marrow erythropoiesis - finding
  • Constitutional aplastic anemia
  • Constitutional red cell aplasia and hypoplasia
  • Constitutional red cell hypoplasia
  • Diamond-Blackfan anemia
  • Erythroid hypoplasia of bone marrow
  • Hypoplastic anemia
  • Pure red cell aplasia

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code D61.01 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 808 - MAJOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL DIAGNOSES EXCEPT SICKLE CELL CRISIS AND COAGULATION DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 809 - MAJOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL DIAGNOSES EXCEPT SICKLE CELL CRISIS AND COAGULATION DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 810 - MAJOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL DIAGNOSES EXCEPT SICKLE CELL CRISIS AND COAGULATION DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert D61.01 to ICD-9

  • 284.01 - Constitution RBC aplasia

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Aplastic and other anemias and other bone marrow failure syndromes (D60-D64)
      • Oth aplastic anemias and other bone marrow failure syndromes (D61)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Anemia

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction.

Conditions that may lead to anemia include

  • Heavy periods
  • Pregnancy
  • Ulcers
  • Colon polyps or colon cancer
  • Inherited disorders
  • A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12
  • Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer
  • Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired
  • G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder

Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache.

Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder that primarily affects the bone marrow. People with this condition often also have physical abnormalities affecting various parts of the body.The major function of bone marrow is to produce new blood cells. In Diamond-Blackfan anemia, the bone marrow malfunctions and fails to make enough red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body's tissues. The resulting shortage of red blood cells (anemia) usually becomes apparent during the first year of life. Symptoms of anemia include fatigue, weakness, and an abnormally pale appearance (pallor).People with Diamond-Blackfan anemia have an increased risk of several serious complications related to their malfunctioning bone marrow. Specifically, they have a higher-than-average chance of developing myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), which is a disorder in which immature blood cells fail to develop normally. Individuals with Diamond-Blackfan anemia also have an increased risk of developing a bone marrow cancer known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a type of bone cancer called osteosarcoma, and other cancers.Approximately half of individuals with Diamond-Blackfan anemia have physical abnormalities. They may have an unusually small head size (microcephaly) and a low frontal hairline, along with distinctive facial features such as wide-set eyes (hypertelorism); droopy eyelids (ptosis); a broad, flat bridge of the nose; small, low-set ears; and a small lower jaw (micrognathia). Affected individuals may also have an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate) with or without a split in the upper lip (cleft lip). They may have a short, webbed neck; shoulder blades that are smaller and higher than usual; and abnormalities of their hands, most commonly malformed or absent thumbs. About one-third of affected individuals have slow growth leading to short stature.Other features of Diamond-Blackfan anemia may include eye problems such as clouding of the lens of the eyes (cataracts), increased pressure in the eyes (glaucoma), or eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus). Affected individuals may also have kidney abnormalities; structural defects of the heart; and, in males, the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias).The severity of Diamond-Blackfan anemia may vary, even within the same family. Increasingly, individuals with "non-classical" Diamond-Blackfan anemia have been identified. This form of the disorder typically has less severe symptoms. For example, some affected individuals have mild anemia beginning later in childhood or in adulthood, while others have some of the physical features but no bone marrow problems.
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