ICD-10-CM Code D59.3

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

D59.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D59.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like congenital hemolytic uremic syndrome, diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome, diarrhea-negative hemolytic uremic syndrome, hemolytic uremic syndrome, hemolytic uremic syndrome of childhood, hemolytic uremic syndrome, adult type, etc

ICD-10:D59.3
Short Description:Hemolytic-uremic syndrome
Long Description:Hemolytic-uremic syndrome

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D59.3:

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code to identify associated:
  • E. coli infection B96.2
  • Pneumococcal pneumonia J13
  • Shigella dysenteriae A03.9

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D59.3 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Congenital hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Diarrhea-negative hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome of childhood
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome, adult type

Clinical Information

  • HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME-. a syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the kidney such as renal cortical necrosis. it is characterized by hemolytic anemia anemia hemolytic; thrombocytopenia; and acute renal failure.
  • ATYPICAL HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME-. an hereditary hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with variations in the gene that encodes complement factor h or the related proteins cfhr1 and cfhr3. disease often progresses to chronic kidney failure without the prodromal symptoms of enterocolitis and diarrhea that characterize typical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

Convert D59.3 to ICD-9

  • 283.11 - Hemolytic uremic synd

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Hemolytic anemias (D55-D59)
      • Acquired hemolytic anemia (D59)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Kidney Diseases

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Platelet Disorders

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small pieces of blood cells. They form in your bone marrow, a sponge-like tissue in your bones. Platelets play a major role in blood clotting. Normally, when one of your blood vessels is injured, you start to bleed. Your platelets will clot (clump together) to plug the hole in the blood vessel and stop the bleeding. You can have different problems with your platelets:

  • If your blood has a low number of platelets, it is called thrombocytopenia. This can put you at risk for mild to serious bleeding. The bleeding could be external or internal. There can be various causes. If the problem is mild, you may not need treatment. For more serious cases, you may need medicines or blood or platelet transfusions.
  • If your blood has too many platelets, you may have a higher risk of blood clots.
    • When the cause is not known, this is called thrombocythemia. It is rare. You may not need treatment if there are no signs or symptoms. In other cases, people who have it may need treatment with medicines or procedures.
    • If another disease or condition is causing the high platelet count, it is thrombocytosis. The treatment and outlook for thrombocytosis depends on what is causing it.
  • Another possible problem is that your platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, your platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach to blood vessel walls. This can cause excessive bleeding. There are different types of in von Willebrand Disease; treatment depends on which type you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a disease that primarily affects kidney function. This condition, which can occur at any age, causes abnormal blood clots (thrombi) to form in small blood vessels in the kidneys. These clots can cause serious medical problems if they restrict or block blood flow. Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is characterized by three major features related to abnormal clotting: hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and kidney failure.Hemolytic anemia occurs when red blood cells break down (undergo hemolysis) prematurely. In atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, red blood cells can break apart as they squeeze past clots within small blood vessels. Anemia results if these cells are destroyed faster than the body can replace them. This condition can lead to unusually pale skin (pallor), yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), fatigue, shortness of breath, and a rapid heart rate.Thrombocytopenia is a reduced level of circulating platelets, which are cell fragments that normally assist with blood clotting. In people with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, fewer platelets are available in the bloodstream because a large number of platelets are used to make abnormal clots. Thrombocytopenia can cause easy bruising and abnormal bleeding.As a result of clot formation in small blood vessels, people with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome experience kidney damage and acute kidney failure that lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in about half of all cases. These life-threatening complications prevent the kidneys from filtering fluids and waste products from the body effectively.Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome should be distinguished from a more common condition called typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The two disorders have different causes and different signs and symptoms. Unlike the atypical form, the typical form is caused by infection with certain strains of Escherichia coli bacteria that produce toxic substances called Shiga-like toxins. The typical form is characterized by severe diarrhea and most often affects children younger than 10. The typical form is less likely than the atypical form to involve recurrent attacks of kidney damage that lead to ESRD.
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