ICD-10-CM Code D56.3

Thalassemia minor

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

D56.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of thalassemia minor. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D56.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like alpha thalassemia-2 trait or alpha trait thalassemia or beta thalassemia trait or hemoglobin lepore trait or heterozygous thalassemia.

ICD-10:D56.3
Short Description:Thalassemia minor
Long Description:Thalassemia minor

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code D56.3:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Alpha thalassemia minor
  • Alpha thalassemia silent carrier
  • Alpha thalassemia trait
  • Beta thalassemia minor
  • Beta thalassemia trait
  • Delta-beta thalassemia minor
  • Delta-beta thalassemia trait
  • Thalassemia trait NOS

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • alpha thalassemia D56.0
  • beta thalassemia D56.1
  • delta-beta thalassemia D56.2
  • hemoglobin E-beta thalassemia D56.5
  • sickle-cell trait D57.3

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D56.3 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Alpha thalassemia-2 trait
  • Alpha trait thalassemia
  • Beta thalassemia trait
  • Hemoglobin Lepore trait
  • Heterozygous thalassemia

Clinical Information

  • BETA THALASSEMIA-. a disorder characterized by reduced synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. there is retardation of hemoglobin a synthesis in the heterozygous form thalassemia minor which is asymptomatic while in the homozygous form thalassemia major cooley's anemia mediterranean anemia erythroblastic anemia which can result in severe complications and even death hemoglobin a synthesis is absent.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code D56.3 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 811 - RED BLOOD CELL DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 812 - RED BLOOD CELL DISORDERS WITHOUT MCC

Convert D56.3 to ICD-9

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Thalassemia

Also called: Cooley's anemia, Mediterranean anemia

Thalassemias are inherited blood disorders. If you have one, your body makes fewer healthy red blood cells and less hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a protein that carries oxygen to the body. That leads to anemia. Thalassemias occur most often among people of Italian, Greek, Middle Eastern, Southern Asian, and African descent.

Thalassemias can be mild or severe. Some people have no symptoms or mild anemia. The most common severe type in the United States is called Cooley's anemia. It usually appears during the first two years of life. People with it may have severe anemia, slowed growth and delayed puberty, and problems with the spleen, liver, heart, or bones.

Doctors diagnose thalassemias using blood tests. Treatments include blood transfusions and treatment to remove excess iron from the body. If you have mild symptoms or no symptoms, you may not need treatment. In some severe cases, you may need a bone marrow transplant.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Thalassemia (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Alpha thalassemia Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to cells throughout the body.In people with the characteristic features of alpha thalassemia, a reduction in the amount of hemoglobin prevents enough oxygen from reaching the body's tissues. Affected individuals also have a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), which can cause pale skin, weakness, fatigue, and more serious complications.Two types of alpha thalassemia can cause health problems. The more severe type is known as hemoglobin Bart hydrops fetalis syndrome, which is also called Hb Bart syndrome or alpha thalassemia major. The milder form is called HbH disease.Hb Bart syndrome is characterized by hydrops fetalis, a condition in which excess fluid builds up in the body before birth. Additional signs and symptoms can include severe anemia, an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), heart defects, and abnormalities of the urinary system or genitalia. As a result of these serious health problems, most babies with this condition are stillborn or die soon after birth. Hb Bart syndrome can also cause serious complications for women during pregnancy, including dangerously high blood pressure with swelling (preeclampsia), premature delivery, and abnormal bleeding.HbH disease causes mild to moderate anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice). Some affected individuals also have bone changes such as overgrowth of the upper jaw and an unusually prominent forehead. The features of HbH disease usually appear in early childhood, and affected individuals typically live into adulthood.
[Learn More]