ICD-10-CM Code D44.6

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body

Version 2021 Billable Code Neoplasm Uncertain Behavior

Valid for Submission

D44.6 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D44.6 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like neoplasm of carotid body or neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body or neoplasm of uncertain behavior of paraganglia.

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms apply to this code given the correct histological behavior: Neoplasm, neoplastic carotid (artery) body .

ICD-10:D44.6
Short Description:Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body
Long Description:Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D44.6 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Neoplasm of carotid body
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of paraganglia

Convert D44.6 to ICD-9

  • 237.3 - Unc behav neo paragang (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Neoplasms of uncertain behavior, polycythemia vera and myelodysplastic syndromes (D37-D48)
      • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of endocrine glands (D44)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Table of Neoplasms

The code D44.6 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »carotid (artery)
    »body
C75.4C79.89D35.5D44.6D49.7

Information for Patients


Carotid Artery Disease

Your carotid arteries are two large blood vessels in your neck. They supply your brain and head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of plaque, which is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood.

Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood flow to your brain, causing a stroke. Too much plaque in the artery can cause a blockage. You can also have a blockage when a piece of plaque or a blood clot breaks off the wall of an artery. The plaque or clot can travel through the bloodstream and get stuck in one of your brain's smaller arteries.

Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms until the blockage or narrowing is severe. One sign may be a bruit (whooshing sound) that your doctor hears when listening to your artery with a stethoscope. Another sign is a transient ischemic attack (TIA), a "mini-stroke." A TIA is like a stroke, but it only lasts a few minutes, and the symptoms usually go away within an hour. Stroke is another sign.

Imaging tests can confirm whether you have carotid artery disease.

Treatments may include

  • Healthy lifestyle changes
  • Medicines
  • Carotid endarterectomy, surgery to remove the plaque
  • Angioplasty, a procedure to place a balloon and stent into the artery to open it and hold it open

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery stenosis -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery surgery - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid duplex (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]