ICD-10-CM Code D43.3

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerves

Version 2020 Billable Code Neoplasm Uncertain Behavior

Valid for Submission

D43.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerves. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D43.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like chiasmal glioma, disorder of olfactory nerve, intracranial optic nerve glioma, intraocular optic nerve glioma, neoplasm of abducens nerve, neoplasm of accessory nerve, etc

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms apply to this code given the correct histological behavior: acoustic nerve ; auditory nerve ; chiasma opticum ; cranial (fossa, any) nerve ; cranial (fossa, any) nerve specified NEC ; ganglia [See Also: Neoplasm, nerve, peripheral] cranial nerve ; nerve (ganglion) abducens ; etc

ICD-10:D43.3
Short Description:Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerves
Long Description:Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerves

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Chiasmal glioma
  • Disorder of olfactory nerve
  • Intracranial optic nerve glioma
  • Intraocular optic nerve glioma
  • Neoplasm of abducens nerve
  • Neoplasm of accessory nerve
  • Neoplasm of facial nerve
  • Neoplasm of glossopharyngeal nerve
  • Neoplasm of hypoglossal nerve
  • Neoplasm of oculomotor nerve
  • Neoplasm of olfactory nerve
  • Neoplasm of trigeminal nerve
  • Neoplasm of trochlear nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of abducens nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of accessory nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of acoustic nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of eye
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of facial nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of glossopharyngeal nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of hypoglossal nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of oculomotor nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of olfactory nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of optic nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of retina
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of trigeminal nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of trochlear nerve
  • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of vagus nerve
  • Neoplasm of vagus nerve
  • Optic nerve glioma
  • Optic nerve glioma of orbit
  • Retrobulbar neuropathy
  • Retrobulbar neuropathy

Convert D43.3 to ICD-9

  • 237.9 - Unc beh neo nerv sys NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Neoplasms of uncertain behavior, polycythemia vera and myelodysplastic syndromes (D37-D48)
      • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of brain and cnsl (D43)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Table of Neoplasms

The code D43.3 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»acoustic nerve
C72.4C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»auditory
  »nerve
C72.4C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»chiasma opticum
C72.3C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»cranial (fossa, any)
  »nerve
C72.50C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»cranial (fossa, any)
  »nerve
    »specified NEC
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»ganglia [See Also: Neoplasm, nerve, peripheral]
  »cranial nerve
C72.50C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »abducens
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »accessory (spinal)
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »acoustic
C72.4C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »auditory
C72.4C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »cranial
C72.50C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »cranial
    »specified NEC
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »facial
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »glossopharyngeal
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »hypoglossal
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »oculomotor
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »olfactory
C47.2C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »optic
C72.3C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »spinal NEC
    »accessory
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »trigeminal
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »trochlear
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»nerve (ganglion)
  »vagus
C72.59C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»olfactory nerve or bulb
C72.2C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7
»optic nerve, chiasm, or tract
C72.3C79.49D33.3D43.3D49.7

Information for Patients


Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


[Learn More]