ICD-10-CM Code D25.9

Leiomyoma of uterus, unspecified

Version 2020 Billable Code Diagnoses For Females Only

Valid for Submission

D25.9 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of leiomyoma of uterus, unspecified. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D25.9 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like antepartum hemorrhage with uterine leiomyoma, antepartum hemorrhage with uterine leiomyoma - not delivered, benign metastasizing leiomyoma of uterus, benign neoplasm of uterine cervix, cervical fibroid, epithelioid leiomyoma of uterus, etc

The code D25.9 is applicable to female patients only. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient.

ICD-10:D25.9
Short Description:Leiomyoma of uterus, unspecified
Long Description:Leiomyoma of uterus, unspecified

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code D25.9 are found in the index:

  • - Fibroid (tumor) - See Also: Neoplasm, connective tissue, benign;
    • - uterus - See Also: Leiomyoma, uterus; - D25.9

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Antepartum hemorrhage with uterine leiomyoma
  • Antepartum hemorrhage with uterine leiomyoma - not delivered
  • Benign metastasizing leiomyoma of uterus
  • Benign neoplasm of uterine cervix
  • Cervical fibroid
  • Epithelioid leiomyoma of uterus
  • Erythrocytosis due to uterine myoma
  • Inappropriate secondary erythrocytosis
  • Intracavitary leiomyoma of uterus
  • Leiomyoblastoma of uterus
  • Pedunculated leiomyoma of uterus
  • Pelvic mass in pregnancy
  • Polyp of corpus uteri
  • Torsion of uterine fibroid
  • Uterine fibroid - baby delivered
  • Uterine fibroid - baby delivered with postpartum complication
  • Uterine fibroid affecting obstetric care
  • Uterine fibroid complicating postpartum care - baby delivered during previous episode of care
  • Uterine fibroid polyp
  • Uterine fibroids affecting pregnancy
  • Uterine fibroids in pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Uterine leiomyoma

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code D25.9 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 742 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 743 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert D25.9 to ICD-9

  • 218.9 - Uterine leiomyoma NOS

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Leiomyoma of uterus (D25)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids are the most common benign tumors in women of childbearing age. Fibroids are made of muscle cells and other tissues that grow in and around the wall of the uterus, or womb. The cause of fibroids is unknown. Risk factors include being African American or being overweight.

Many women with fibroids have no symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include

  • Heavy or painful periods or bleeding between periods
  • Feeling "full" in the lower abdomen
  • Urinating often
  • Pain during sex
  • Lower back pain
  • Reproductive problems, such as infertility, multiple miscarriages or early labor

Your health care provider may find fibroids during a gynecological exam or by using imaging tests. Treatment includes drugs that can slow or stop their growth, or surgery. If you have no symptoms, you may not even need treatment. Many women with fibroids can get pregnant naturally. For those who cannot, infertility treatments may help.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development


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