2021 ICD-10-CM Code D23.111

Other benign neoplasm of skin of right upper eyelid, including canthus

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

D23.111 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other benign neoplasm of skin of right upper eyelid, including canthus. The code D23.111 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code D23.111 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like benign neoplasm of skin of right eyelid or benign neoplasm of skin of right upper eyelid.

ICD-10:D23.111
Short Description:Other benign neoplasm skin/ right upper eyelid, inc canthus
Long Description:Other benign neoplasm of skin of right upper eyelid, including canthus

Code Classification

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Replacement Code

D23111 replaces the following previously assigned ICD-10 code(s):

Information for Patients


Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


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Skin Conditions

Also called: Cutaneous disorders, Dermatologic disorders

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin

Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019